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6 results for Our State Vol. 67 Issue 11, Apr 2000
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Record #:
4578
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H. H. and C. S. Brimley, immigrant English boys, came to Raleigh in 1880. Herbert became an outstanding taxidermist and worked for the Museum of Natural Science for sixty years, fifty-one as curator and director. Clement was an entomologist for the Agriculture Department and published the first catalog of insects in the South, The List of Insects of North Carolina. The Brimleys were the state's most influential naturalists, whose work left a lasting mark on the state. They are remembered in an exhibit at the new North Carolina Museum of Natural Science in Raleigh.
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Record #:
4576
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The actors are not superstars. The budgets are often shoestring. Yet the creators of independent films within the state and without produce bold, original, and audacious shorts, features, and documentaries on topics Hollywood often avoids. Many independent films are showcased at the state's film festivals. Comer profiles the DoubleTake Film Festival at Durham's Carolina Theater, the Cucalous Film Festival in Wilmington, and the RiverRun International Film Festival in Brevard.
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Record #:
4579
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A diverse array of wildflowers blooms in North Carolina's mountains from March through September. Setzer recounts her spring experiences trekking in the mountains, looking for wildflowers. The author includes a bloom chart categorizing wildflowers by month bloomed, color of blossom, and leaves.
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4618
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There is a mystery on the Tryon Palace grounds. Where was the palace's original garden? There are three maps of it prepared by Claude Joseph Southier in the 18th-century, but they are contradictory. One, the Miranda Map of 1783, was lost and did not surface until 1991 in Venezuela. Using maps, historical documents, and dirt, an archaeological team from East Carolina University is working to solve the mystery. A 1999 north lawn dig eliminated that area as the possible site. The team will return in the summer of 2000 for a dig on the south lawn.
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4621
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There are around 200 newspapers in the state. About 37 percent are privately owned. The News Reporter in Whiteville is 104 years old and has seen three generations sit at the editor's and publisher's desks. The paper is a survivor. Of the eleven Columbus County newspapers in existence between 1878 and 1908, only the Reporter remains. In 1954, the newspaper shared the Pulitzer Prize for Meritorious Service with the Tabor City Tribune. The papers courageously investigated the Ku Klux Klan.
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Record #:
4620
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North Carolina is home to a number of small publishing companies, including Coastal Carolina Press, McFarland & Company, and Algonquin Books. These and other local publishers are becoming a force in the book world. The emphasis is on quality. Books generally have small runs, but some, like Gap Creek, run to 600,000. Titles are those New York publishers don't consider profitable, like The Volcano Registry; Japanese Baseball, A Statistical Handbook; and The Greek Filmography.
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