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25 results for Motion picture industry
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Record #:
624
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\"Billy Bathgate\" was partially filmed in Hamlet. The movie industry in North Carolina continues to grow.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 3, Mar 1991, p8, il
Record #:
978
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The film industry in North Carolina reeled in $391 million last year, up 48 percent from 1991.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 51 Issue 3, Mar 1993, p41, por
Record #:
1041
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North Carolina has gained a reputation as an hospitable state for the film industry; the potential impact of a film production on a small town is considerable.
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Record #:
1260
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The state's historic sites and breathtaking natural settings have provided the backdrop for films and otherwise attracted the film industry to North Carolina.
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Record #:
1770
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Four North Carolina State University students are on the verge of breaking into the exclusive and competitive motion picture industry. They have assembled an impressive investment package to market their screenplay, \"The Delicate Art of the Rifle\".
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 12 Issue 28, July 1994, p13, por Periodical Website
Record #:
1798
Abstract:
\"Nell,\" a feature film produced by and starring Jodie Foster, was filmed on location in Graham County and in Charlotte.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 12 Issue 33, Aug 1994, p15, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
2028
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Abstract:
Increased production of movies, television shows, and commercials has raised North Carolina's ranking in filmmaking to number two in the country. Film industry spending in the state reached an all-time high of over a half-billion dollars in 1993.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 61 Issue 12, May 1994, p6-7, il
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Record #:
2186
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The state's independent filmmakers often have to make low-budget films just to make ends meet. However, as filmmakers become more business-smart and local investors understand the industry better, funding and film quality will improve.
Record #:
2298
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When Governor James B. Hunt, Jr. established the N.C. Film Office by executive order in 1980, director Bill Arnold had no operating budget. Now the state ranks No. 2 nationwide in filmmaking, with nearly $4 billion spent by filmmakers.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 53 Issue 5, May 1995, p14, por
Record #:
2296
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Although ranked No. 2 nationwide in the filmmaking industry, the N.C. Film Council, an advisory group, feels the film office should broaden its scope to include things like cable channel production, imaging technology, and post-production activities.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 53 Issue 5, May 1995, p13, 15-18, il
Record #:
2433
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Abstract:
Beginning in the 1980s, Wilmington emerged as the leader in the state's growing film industry. The city produced $391 million in revenues in 1993 alone, while the state as a whole generated $504 million.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 2, July 1995, p21-30, il
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Record #:
2855
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With the establishment of the North Carolina Film Office in 1980 and the creation of lighter moviemaking equipment, filmmaking in the state began to increase in places like Wilmington, Charlotte, and High Point.
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Record #:
2936
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The existence of art houses - theaters that show independent and foreign films - is threatened by the 1980s movie industry deregulation, which allows large companies to buy theater chains and to control film distribution and exhibition.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 14 Issue 18, May 1996, p21, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4123
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One of the state's greatest attractions to movie makers is its geographic diversity, featuring mountains and coasts, with big cities and skyscrapers, quaint towns, and farms sprinkled in between. Filmmaking began soon after the N.C. Film Office opened in 1980. Since then over 450 films have been made that have added $5 billion to the economy.
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Record #:
4576
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The actors are not superstars. The budgets are often shoestring. Yet the creators of independent films within the state and without produce bold, original, and audacious shorts, features, and documentaries on topics Hollywood often avoids. Many independent films are showcased at the state's film festivals. Comer profiles the DoubleTake Film Festival at Durham's Carolina Theater, the Cucalous Film Festival in Wilmington, and the RiverRun International Film Festival in Brevard.
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