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6 results for North Carolina Vol. 63 Issue 12, Dec 2005
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Record #:
7590
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina, the nation's most military friendly state, is home to some of the largest and best-known military bases, including Camp Lejeune, Fort Bragg, and Seymour-Johnson Air Base. Tourists are drawn to the state to visit military-related sites that include memorials, museums, restored aircraft, and a battleship. The Duplin County Veterans Museum recognizes men and women from that area who served in the military. A number of memorials on the grounds of the state Capitol in Raleigh honor soldiers who served in many wars. Fayetteville features the Airborne & Special Operations Museum, a $22.5 million, 59,000-square-foot building. The battleship NORTH CAROLINA, moored in Wilmington, honors the 10,000 North Carolinians who died in World War II.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 12, Dec 2005, p23-24, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
7592
Author(s):
Abstract:
Phil Kirk has been president and CEO of North Carolina Citizens for Business and Industry (NCCBI) and publisher of NORTH CAROLINA magazine for the past sixteen years. He resigned recently to pursue other challenges. Kirk has been a chief of staff to two North Carolina governors and a U.S. Congressman, chairman of the North Carolina State Board of Education, and a lobbyist in the General Assembly.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 12, Dec 2005, p54, il
Record #:
7589
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina towns celebrate New Year's Eve in a variety of ways. Raleigh lowers an acorn, and Charlotte lights up its crown. Other towns have more unusual ways. Brasstown drops a possum; Mt. Olive drops a three-foot, lighted dill pickle down the flagpole at the corner of Cucumber and Vine; and in Oriental, the Good Luck Dragon runs up and down the waterfront.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 12, Dec 2005, p12, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
7591
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina ranks fourth in the country in the number of military personnel. The military contributes $18 billion per year to the gross state product. More than 330, 000 jobs are linked to the military. But when it comes to obtaining military contracts, the state is near the bottom. Bivins discusses what can be done to change this.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 12, Dec 2005, p42, 44, 4649, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
7593
Author(s):
Abstract:
Artist Bob Timberlake of Lexington is featured in NORTH CAROLINA magazine executive profile. In 1970, at age 33, he left a successful business career to follow a lifelong dream of painting. In 2005, he marks thirty-five years as one of America's best-known artists. His paintings of rural scenes have a worldwide appeal that awakens in viewers nostalgic feelings and childhood memories. Lexington's new Bob Timberlake Gallery, a retail store, welcome center, gallery, and museum all in one, sums up the artist's career. The 16,000-square-foot facility contains examples of his world-famous work.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 12, Dec 2005, p50-53, il, por
Record #:
8411
Abstract:
The North Carolina Automobile Dealers Association is known as a group that gives back to their community and encourages participation in community service and excelling in their industry. The association recognizes individuals who accomplish both. The NCADA has sponsored the NC Teacher of the Year Program for six years. The 2005 winner was Wendy Miller, a K-2 teacher at James W. Smith Elementary School in Craven County. The Lifetime Achievement Award is given to association members who display a strong commitment to their industry and to their local community. The 2005 award winners were Ransom Lee Bush, Lenoir; John D. Greene, Morganton; Hubert Parks, Kernersville; and Carl S. Ragsdale, Jacksonville.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 12, Dec 2005, p31-33, por