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9 results for North Carolina Literary Review Vol. Issue 11, 2002
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Record #:
19823
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Black Mountain College of Black Mountain, North Carolina played prominent roles in modern art, the Beats poetry movement, and as a groundbreaking experiment in sociology. For its 22 years of existence, the college was populated by nonconformists and free thinkers who argued progressive issues of the day through painting, sculpture, music, poetry, and literature. In the liberal and progressive environment of Black Mountain College, women played a prominent role in the development and progression of the college. The women of Black Mountain College listed in the article were interviewed regarding their experiences at the college and how it helped to shape their lives.
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Record #:
19820
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In the Fall of 2001, two conferences held at the campuses of UNC-Chapel Hill and East Carolina University explored the history and legacy of 18th century North Carolina colonist John Lawson. Presenters at UNC-Chapel Hill focused on Lawson's exploits and influence as a naturalist in the New World. The East Carolina University conference focused on Lawson's life and exploration in North Carolina. Presentations from archaeologists and botanists discussed Native American history and the actual path Lawson took while explorer the region.
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Record #:
19822
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Emil Willimetz, the son of Austrian immigrants, was without direction after his graduation from high school in 1936. He took to the rails and roads of the United States, hitchhiking his way until he came to Black Mountain College in Black Mountain, North Carolina. After a fortuitous encounter with some Black Mountain College faculty, Willimetz found a home at the college that set him on a path towards a career in print, photo, and film.
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Record #:
19819
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Colonization of North Carolina was littered with conflict between English settlers and the native population, especially the Tuscarora. The strife between the colonists and the hostile tribes of the Carolinas ended by 1726 as the colonial government and its native allies wiped out their enemies.
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Record #:
19821
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Author Mark Ogilvie was touched by the literary and musical work of Wade Wellman at a young age. Wellman set his fiction in North Carolina and wove local folk songs into his work. While in college, Ogilvie embarked on a journey to discover the North Carolina locations where several Wellman works were set and the local lore that inspired them.
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Record #:
19824
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The fall of 1999 was a devastating one for the people of eastern North Carolina. A trio of hurricanes battered the region, particularly Hurricane Floyd, causing flood and storm damage to thousands of homes. The Southern Oral History Program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill collected a host of stories from eastern North Carolina residents about their experiences with the flooding caused by Hurricane Floyd and how neighbors and strangers came together.
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Record #:
19825
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Texas native Gwen Ashley Walters held the notion that many Texans hold, that Texas barbecue is the only true barbeque and that other regional specialties were imitations at best. This changed when her husband, a former North Carolinian, took her to Stamey's Barbecue in Greensboro. Her experience with North Carolina style barbecue opened her to new possibilities and the existence of delicious barbeque outside of Texas.
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Record #:
19826
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Pat's Soda Shop of Vanceboro has been a local institution for over the past fifty years. Owned by Dick Cleve, Pat's specializes in a wide selection of 'ades,' a delightfully sweet beverage that can be tailored to any palate. In addition, the shop carries the a wide variety of snacks, knick knacks, and beach toys.
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Record #:
19827
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In May 2001, Snow L. and B.W.C. Roberts of Durham donated approximately 1,100 works of fiction, written between 1830 and the present, to the North Carolina Collection, J.Y. Joyner Library at East Carolina University. The donated collection only contains books related to North Carolina.
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