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5 results for North Carolina Insight Vol. 22 Issue 2-3, May 2007
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Record #:
9165
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Abstract:
The North Carolina Center for Public Policy Research first evaluated charter schools in 2002. The conclusion then was that the state should continue the experiment and wait for five more years of data before deciding whether or not to expand the program and remove the cap which limited the number of schools to one hundred. Manuel discusses what the new data tells about academic performance, racial balance, transfers of innovations in charter schools to public schools, and management and financial compliance.
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North Carolina Insight (NoCar JK 4101 N3x), Vol. 22 Issue 2-3, May 2007, p2-28, 32-37, 44-71, il, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
9164
Author(s):
Abstract:
Legislation passed by the 1996 General Assembly provides for the establishment of charter schools, or schools run by private, non-profit organizations. It is an experiment to see if removing state regulations will improve student performance. Manuel profiles four of these schools: Gaston College Preparatory, Northampton County; Quest Academy, North Raleigh; Children's Community School, Davidson; and Carolina International School, Cabarrus County.
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Record #:
9166
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Duda examines charter school programs in other states, including Florida, California, Ohio, New York, South Carolina, and Washington.
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Record #:
9188
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Too many students in the state are dropping out of school, placing North Carolina among the lowest states in that category. Stallings' discussion of the dropout problem includes how North Carolina tracks and measures dropout rates; which students drop out and why; and what the state and local school districts are doing to reduce the dropout rate. The article concludes with six recommendations for improving the state's dropout problem.
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Record #:
18889
Author(s):
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The state authorized charter schools in 1996 and since then 138 schools have been, at one point, operational. In 2007, 100 of these charter schools were functioning throughout the state. An assessment of these schools based on student learning, facilities, management, and financing demonstrates that charter schools often have lower scores in these areas when compared with public schools. Using information from the N.C. Center for Public Policy Research, the author makes suggestions for improving charter school performance and how to create a better educational environment for charter school students.
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