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3 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 63 Issue 3, July 1986
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Record #:
21488
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Until the early part of the 20th century, the Eastern Band of Cherokee lived in isolation in the remote mountains of North Carolina, having little interest in the affairs of the United States or the world. To incorporate them into modern events, the Indian Office and Bureau of Indian Affairs used World War I as an excuse to modernize the tribe. Members of the Eastern Band of Cherokee entered into American service for the war through conscription in which some members agreed to participate and some did it under protest. Through their involvement in the war, members became more familiar with the modern world and brought that knowledge back to the tribe.
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Record #:
21490
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Abstract:
The town of Princeville (until 1885, Freedom Hill) was a self-segregated black town in Edgecombe County that experienced a good degree of growth and economic prosperity between 1865 and 1915. During Reconstruction, Princeville residents found economic success through a blend of agricultural and non-agricultural employment. During the agricultural depression of the 1880s, the town benefited from the surrounding area's industrial industry. A high percentage of Princeville residents were employed in service and labor jobs in nearby industrial centers. This steady employment for its citizens helped grow Princeville's government, schools, and churches.
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Record #:
21489
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1877, the Episcopal men of Raleigh founded a philanthropic organization called St. John's Guild. The organization existed to facilitate charitable works and provide a means of social activity for members. The group was very active in Raleigh, establishing a library, reading room and a hospital. Local Episcopal clergy, in addition to several citizens contributed greatly to the charitable works of the organization. The guild ceased to exist in 1893 as the time and funds needed to run the organization were lacking from members.
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