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5 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 36 Issue 4, Oct 1959
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Record #:
20821
Abstract:
This article gives attention to the often overlooked efforts of President Garfield to break up the \"Solid South\" and his attempts to recover his party's political power in the region during the early years of Reconstruction. Attention is given to political trends and strengths in the South during Reconstruction, the political strength of Southern Democrats, as well as both parties' approaches to issues such as controversies over race, the Civil War, and the military occupation of the South.
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Record #:
20823
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This is a reprint of the lyrics of a Gaelic lullaby written by Scottish immigrant, loyalist and poet John MacRae and is perhaps the first piece of extant Gaelic poetry composed in North America. Arriving in North Carolina in 1774, MacRae composed the lullaby for his daughter sometime before his imprisonment and death during the Revolutionary War. The song lyrics are provided in both Gaelic and English, and some explanation of the tune and meter are provided in the introduction.
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Record #:
20822
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This is a transcript of a speech given by Francis B. Dedmond, author and head of the English department at Gardener Webb College, on his process and his opinions on writing a college history.
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Record #:
20817
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This article gives a history of Asheville theater between 1879 and 1931. Venues included the Asheville Grand Opera House and the Asheville Auditorium.
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Record #:
20824
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This is a reprint of diary entries and letters written by Confederate soldier Leonidas Torrence during his service with the \"Gaston Guards,\" Company H, Thirteenth North Carolina Regiment. Most notably, Torrence writes during his march north towards Gettysburg, recording his battle experiences through July 4th, when he was fatally wounded. Also included are letters from W.J. O'Daniel to Torrence's mother informing her first of her son being wounded in action, and then informing her and providing details of his death.
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