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4 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 35 Issue 4, Oct 1958
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20349
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In 1890, African-Americans made up nearly 50% of the total urban population in North Carolina. The dominance of these populations in towns and cities has raised the question of how these groups earned a living given the economic limitations placed on them by the white populations of the state. This article looks at African-Americans in domestic and personal service, manufacturing and mechanical industries, trade, and transportation, as well as business and professional men and women.
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Record #:
20347
Author(s):
Abstract:
French commerce and military aid to the colonies helped to fill the trade vacuum left by British commerce loss. French exports to America reached a high level in the 1780s. Trade directed toward North Carolina was extensive because larger American ports were blockaded or occupied by the British during the Revolution. Additionally, naval stores, North Carolina's major export, figured into the French-American trade, although only slightly.
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Record #:
20348
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Lambert focuses on the account of a community in the Great Smokies, and life in the Oconaluftee Valley near the town of Cherokee in Swain County.
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Record #:
20350
Author(s):
Abstract:
After torpedoes plowed through Mobile Bay in 1864, the North and South became riveted on the last remaining port open to the Confederacy in Wilmington. In an attempt to smash Fort Fisher, guardian of the Cape Fear River approach to Wilmington, Rear Adm. David D. Porter was recalled from the interior to the Atlantic coast to lead the U.S. Navy in land-sea assaults on this last stronghold, and lead the final significant naval action of the American Civil War. This article displays the letters of Porter, as he discusses the preparation of attacks on Fort Fisher, the importance of Wilmington, supply problems, and administrative confusion.
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