NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


7 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 31 Issue 4, Oct 1954
Currently viewing results 1 - 7
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
20213
Author(s):
Abstract:
Considered as one of North Carolina's controversial figures, William W. Holden was a leading editor, leader in four political parties, and chief executive of the state on two occasions. Holden also built the Democratic Party to dominance in North Carolina but controversy over controlled interests forced him to split from the party. By 1860, Holden shifted from his militant view of state succession, promoting the role of North Carolina as a mediator, or peace maker, against the overthrow of national government.
Full Text:
Record #:
20214
Abstract:
The governing of colonial North Carolina was hierarchical and orderly. The Vice-Admiralty court played a dual role in North Carolina, in one capacity the arbitrator of all ocean commerce conflicts, and also the agency that heard and determined cases involving infringements on the British Navigation Acts.
Full Text:
Record #:
20212
Abstract:
A system of tax-financed relief for the needy, which was administered by local governments was brought to the colonies from England. In accordance with an act of 1701, likely the first poor law in the colony, Chowan precinct levied a tax for the support of the pauper. Thus began the various provisions for poor relief in North Carolina.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
20215
Author(s):
Abstract:
In this second installment of an article from July 1954, Green discusses the reaction of North Carolinians to celebrating the Fourth of July for 100 years since the signing of the Declaration of Independence.
Full Text:
Record #:
20211
Author(s):
Abstract:
Stephen A. Douglas called for popular sovereignty as a doctrine for settlement of territorial slave issues in the 1854 Kansas-Nebraska bill. In an order to shape the North Carolina opinion, William Waightstill Avery, the delegate from Burke County, served as chairman of the platform committee at the Democratic Convention of 1860.
Full Text:
Record #:
20210
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the last quarter of the 18th century a group of people in Guilford County were known as the Nicholites, taking their name from the founder of a religious society, Joseph Nichols. This group abstained from war, swearing, profanity, and oath making.
Full Text:
Record #:
20216
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article concludes another piece from July, 1954 that looks at the push for a common literature of North Carolina through the letters of its most staunch promoter, Calvin Henderson Wiley.
Full Text: