NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


6 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 29 Issue 3, July 1952
Currently viewing results 1 - 6
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
20445
Author(s):
Abstract:
Colonial North Carolinians demanded a great deal of autonomy from the suppressing English government. Governors of the colony found it difficult to collect taxes without adequate support from the crown and if collected revenue was not used locally it was impossible to get taxes from the populace. North Carolinians' independent spirit was further inflamed with the introduction of the Stamp Act of 1765. The author looks at the colonist's opposition to this act which primarily came from the aristocratic plantation owning sect of the population.
Full Text:
Record #:
20447
Abstract:
North Carolinians were divided on the issue of succession at the outbreak of war because of the state's growing industrial nature. The Whig Party or \"Unionists\" hesitated to secede without deliberation while the Democrats or \"Secessionists\" believed it was the state's honor and duty to join the Confederacy. Both parties argued their sides in Federal and Confederate Congresses without reaching compromise. The author reviews each side's ideals and attempts to define the objectives of each party which were sometimes blurred.
Full Text:
Record #:
20450
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1927, only 35% of the state's citizens had access to public library services but by 1942 this number increased dramatically to 85%. Though a number of variables factor into the expansion of public library services, the author credits the state-wide Works Progress Administration (WPA) Library Project with being the most influential. Sponsored by the North Carolina Library Commission and the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, the WPA Library project's two main goals were to \"strengthen existing library agencies\" and \"help establish permanent service on county or regional basis.\"
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
20446
Author(s):
Abstract:
Raleigh's first theater was completed in 1814 and prior to that most performance based entertainment was held at the State House. The author tracks the theater's early history including the multiple changes of ownership after opening and the types of professional acts which performed within. Before the war a range of acts used the space from musicals, to dramas, and even ventriloquism. The final Ante-Bellum attraction was the Bunyan panorama in December 1861.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
20444
Author(s):
Abstract:
Christopher Newport was a prominent English captain who was involved in several important expeditions. Newport sailed one of the ships on the 1590 Jamestown expedition. The author recounts the events of the Jamestown Expedition to Roanoke Island but focuses primarily on the activities of Christopher Newport based on new archival material discovered by the Hakluyt Society.
Full Text:
Record #:
20448
Abstract:
A continuation of articles written to President Andrew Johnson during Reconstruction by citizens of North Carolina. The letters reprinted here are from November 1867 to December 1867.
Full Text: