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4 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 25 Issue 1, Jan 1948
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Record #:
19985
Abstract:
The Walter Clark Papers are part of the State Department of Archives and History and contain several letters between Clark and Professor William E. Dodd of the University of Chicago. Clark served the state as a politician and jurist who served as associate justice and chief justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court from 1889 to 1924. Clark wrote to Dodd about historical and constitutional questions from 1906 to 1924 and these are reprinted in this issue.
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Record #:
19984
Author(s):
Abstract:
Farm journals were a major source of agricultural information in the 19th century. North Carolina published thirteen journals of the 500 publications produced nationwide before 1870. The author discusses these titles and their circulation across the state and nation, topics of discussion within such publications, and the readership of such papers.
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Record #:
20023
Abstract:
In order to overcome topographical issues and further trade, both within state boundaries and internationally, a system of canals was developed in the state. Prior to 1815, private companies bid on such navigation projects with only two companies obtaining enough funds to complete or at least begin projects; one being the Dismal Swamp Canal Company and the other the Clubfoot and Harlow's Creek Canal. Archibald D. Murphey presented a program to the legislature to include public funds in financing navigational improvements within the state.
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Record #:
20024
Abstract:
The Vinson family lived on a farm near Wayne County Poor House prior to the Civil War and consisted of father Thomas Robert, mother Martha Fletcher, daughters Rachel and Mary, and sons Uriah, Daniel, and Benjamin. The three boys joined the Confederate ranks and wrote to their families during their time as soldiers. These letters are reprinted here and offer insight into the life of the common soldier.
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