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5 results for North Carolina Geographer Vol. 5 Issue , Winter 1996
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Record #:
16899
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the early 19th century, North Carolina experienced the first fold mining boom in North America. By the 1830s a federal branch mint had been built in Charlotte and occupations in gold production were second only to agriculture. North Carolina's mines received a great deal of attention from northern and foreign venture capitalists, who brought not only investment but skilled labor and management to the deep mines of the Piedmont. Many of these skilled miners were Cornishmen, who brought their mining heritage, refined over centuries of experience, into this new field of opportunity.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 5 Issue , Winter 1996, p1-10, map, bibl, f
Record #:
16902
Author(s):
Abstract:
As physicians orient toward a changing health care system, they increasingly establish secondary and tertiary practice locations. Sixteen percent of North Carolina's physicians had multiple locations during 1992. The expansion into multiple sites has clear implications for the geographic distribution of physicians and therefore the availability of and access to physicians.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 5 Issue , Winter 1996, p41-51, bibl, f
Subject(s):
Record #:
16901
Abstract:
With the dramatic demographic transformation facing the United States population, North Carolina is seeing a growing number of Hispanics in the State.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 5 Issue , Winter 1996, p21-40, bibl, f
Record #:
16900
Author(s):
Abstract:
In this article, Robinson discusses the climate differences between North Carolina's Piedmont and mountain regions.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 5 Issue , Winter 1996, p11-20, map, bibl, f
Record #:
16903
Abstract:
With a barrier island coast and vast areas of estuaries, North Carolina is particularly vulnerable to global warming. In addition, agriculture and urban areas are now more vulnerable to changes in temperature and precipitation associated with global warming. Thus, this article explores global warming and associated methane emissions in North Carolina.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 5 Issue , Winter 1996, p53-63, map, bibl, f
Subject(s):