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5 results for North Carolina Geographer Vol. 4 Issue , Winter 1995
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Record #:
16896
Abstract:
Accelerated soil erosion, due to agriculture and construction, is a serious concern in North Carolina. Using geographic information systems, researchers examined historical land use patterns in a southern Appalachian watershed and related techniques to relate those activities to estimated spatial and temporal patterns of soil erosion since the implementation of soil conservation programs.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 4 Issue , Winter 1995, p31-39, map, bibl, f
Record #:
16898
Abstract:
Many North Carolina citizens rely on ground water for their drinking water. Thus, the importance of preventing groundwater contamination is high. Harman and Smutko discuss the federal and state government's role in wellhead protection and highlight Gaston County in the process of developing a county-wide wellhead protection program.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 4 Issue , Winter 1995, p53-61, map, bibl, f
Record #:
16897
Author(s):
Abstract:
Agriculture is the predominant economic activity in south-central North Carolina. Though abundant arable land is available for increased production, expansion and refinement is often hindered by frequent and sometimes severe droughts, associated with high temperatures and sandy soil. Ross argues for increased rates and levels of irrigation that would result in a more consistent and higher quality product.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 4 Issue , Winter 1995, p41-51, map, bibl, f
Subject(s):
Record #:
16894
Author(s):
Abstract:
Industrialization in North Carolina quickened in the 1880s, led by the textile industry. Textile mills sprang up in rural areas and towns, thereby leading to the development of mill villages. In this article, Eyre traces the broad outlines of how the functions and character of former mill villages have been altered by the widening economic influences of part of the Piedmont crescent.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 4 Issue , Winter 1995, p1-13, map, bibl, f
Subject(s):
Record #:
16895
Author(s):
Abstract:
Gade discusses the environmental, geographical, and political contexts of changing regions in North Carolina.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 4 Issue , Winter 1995, p15-30, map, bibl, f