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6 results for North Carolina Folklore Journal Vol. 51 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2004
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Record #:
6839
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Abstract:
Dr. Mary Anne McDonald has worked for over twenty years to document and present North Carolina folklife. Her work covers a wide variety of traditional cultures, forms of presentation, and different professional settings. The North Carolina Folklore Society awarded McDonald a 2003 Brown-Hudson Award for preserving, researching, and disseminating North Carolina's folk culture.
Record #:
6838
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Folklore Society awarded guitarist Fred David Olson of Asheboro a 2003 Brown-Hudson Award. Olson grew up in a musical household and began playing the guitar in the 1940s. Over the years he has played in a musical group that has included some of North Carolina's best-known folk musicians, such as violinist Lauchlin Shaw and dulcimer player Virgil Craven. Olson received the award for his lifetime of work as a performer and collector of North Carolina music.
Record #:
6840
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Folklore Society's Community Traditions Award originated in 1992 and is given to organizations that make valuable contributions to the state's folk life. The 2003 award was presented to the Foundation for Shackleford Horses, Inc. for championing the wild horses during the 1990s against manmade and natural threats to their long-term survival. Their work resulted in federal legislation in 1998 that gave protection to the horses.
Record #:
6837
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Folklore Society awarded blues singer Luther Mayer a 2003 Brown-Hudson Award for a lifetime of work as one of North Carolina's most versatile musical performers. A Winston-Salem resident, Mayer began developing his musical style on his grandparent's farm in Clinton. Mayer performs not only blues but also gospel and popular music.
Record #:
36393
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beginning in 1983, Cambodian refugees began entering Greensboro, fleeing Cambodia due to violence from a civil war. An exhibit was on display at the Greensboro Historical Museum until December 2005, and was comprised of five sections which have been included in the article as well: Ancient Khmer History Lives Today, War and Tradition, Culture/Tradition and Change, An Enduring Belief in Buddhism, and Creating Community Through Local and Global Connection.