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4 results for North Carolina Folklore Journal Vol. 34 Issue 2, Summer-Fall 1987
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Record #:
16303
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When questions arise concerning the history or traditions of the Lumbee Indians of North Carolina, the first person approached is Adolph Dial, a Lumbee historian and humanitarian. Dial, the chairman of the American Indian studies Department at Pembroke State University, has long been recognized, locally and nationally, for his knowledge and contributions to the preservation and perpetuation of the oral and written history and folk traditions of the Lumbee people. His accomplishments include the creation of the Lumbee Regional Development Association (LRDA), the outdoor drama Strike at the Wind, the tribal history THE ONLY LAND I KNOW, and the organization of the Department of American Indian Studies at Pembroke State University.
Record #:
16302
Author(s):
Abstract:
The traditional arts and crafts of the Eastern Band of the Cherokee people, originally functional or ritual in use, are attractive to modern peoples for their fine quality and decorativeness. They are valued not only for their beauty but because they embody the Cherokee traditions. A major force in the continuation and appreciation of the traditional crafts of the Eastern Band has been the Qualla Arts and Crafts Mutual, a craftpersons' cooperative in the town of Cherokee under the management of Betty DuPree.
Record #:
16305
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Abstract:
Although folk narratives in the southern United States and Ireland are similar, each represent a unique part of their respective cultures while combining to form a single subgenre of folk tales: the Jack Tale. Henigan discusses the Jack Tale tradition of Ireland and the United States to examine the differences in order to demonstrate the ways in which each depends upon and reflects its own cultural climate.
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Record #:
16304
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Abstract:
Towey discusses the themes of alienation and literacy in the novels of Zora Neale Hurston, and her use of the oral cultures and communities that produced strong personal identities for African Americans.
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