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6 results for New East Vol. 5 Issue 3, May/June 1977
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Record #:
6027
Abstract:
Modern outdoor drama began in Manteo with the first performance of The Lost Colony. In this NEW EAST interview playwright Paul Green reminisces about his most famous creation.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 3, May/June 1977, p18-21, por
Record #:
35484
Author(s):
Abstract:
History comes to life—of pirates, in particular—through a group of actors whose show became part of the state’s Bicentennial activities. These thespians—in real life, including a family of six—included in their reenactment of life on the high seas a ship, the Meka II. The ship that’s also their home was built by the man who may be called Captain, but is called Horatio Sinbad by his family, Ross Morphew.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 3, May/June 1977, p22-25, 46-48
Record #:
35483
Author(s):
Abstract:
Advice was dispensed by the author and her expert sources, including a professor from the University of North Carolina’s Institute of Marine Sciences. Examples of their tips were collection times, places (e.g. Shackleford Banks), care, and identification. To highlight their worth, commonly defined in souvenir status, the author noted other purposes, ranging from containers to decorations, from coinage to dye source.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 3, May/June 1977, p14-17, 59
Record #:
35482
Author(s):
Abstract:
A victim can be the Central America, a ship that an oceanographic atlas and US Navy wreck list had tried to locate. Victim can be defined by the loss of 482 human lives. In this case, victim directly alluded to the loss of gold. Approximately $600,000 of this precious metal—in the form of coins, dust, and nuggets—was jettisoned by the crew into the sand clouded briny deep.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 3, May/June 1977, p10-13, 45, 47
Record #:
35485
Author(s):
Abstract:
Story, in this case, crossed the line between fiction and non-fiction. the author noted that her grandmother Mary Casey was a “walking, talking, history book of the Outer Banks.” More history than story can be perceived in recollections that included references to Daniel Boone and the unsavory early days of Hyde County.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 3, May/June 1977, p30-33, 41
Record #:
35486
Author(s):
Abstract:
The destruction of the Outer Banks, according to the author, can be traced back to the realty development that started during the Great Depression. The destruction of the decades can be perceived in the erosion of the beach and pollution of water. Fortunately, the observation of this yield ended on a hopeful notes. The author concluded that, what human beings have done, can be undone with a combination of cooperative government programs and love for the land.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 3, May/June 1977, p34-37