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3 results for Metro Magazine Vol. 7 Issue 2, Feb 2006
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7717
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Plans are underway to develop a mega seaport just above Southport. The port will be four times as large as Wilmington and rival Charleston, South Carolina, and Norfolk, Virginia. The new port will handle two million containers a year and have space for four ships to dock at a four-thousand-foot structure. The North Carolina Ports Authority is negotiating for 600 acres of land to start the project, but the acreage is only the beginning. Land will be needed for roads, railroads, and storage facilities to support the port. On the downside is what might occur to the fragile eco-structure of the area. Although the port is years away, Leutze argues for taking a hard look at planning instead of taking the approach of “Let's build it and see what happens.”
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Record #:
7715
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Dorothea Dix Hospital, which stands on a high hill overlooking the city of Raleigh, was the state's first hospital to treat mental illness. The North Carolina General Assembly approved appropriations for the hospital on December 23, 1848. Lea recounts the history of the institution from its opening to its closing. Today much of the land has been deeded away by the State of North Carolina, but a core section, dotted with dozens of interesting and historical buildings, remains. This core section is up for grabs, and the legislature is reviewing proposals of what to do with it. One promising proposal would designate Dix Hill as a Park District.
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Record #:
7716
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On November 3, 1979, the Communist Workers Party held a “Death to the Klan” rally in Greensboro. A clash with the Ku Klux Klan resulted, leaving five CWP members shot dead in the streets and several wounded. Several Klansmen and Nazi party members were charged with murder, but were acquitted in both state and federal courts. Recently activist groups in Greensboro set up a Truth and Reconciliation tribunal to revisit the event and issue a report in April 2006.
Source:
Metro Magazine (NoCar F 264 R1 M48), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Feb 2006, p20-23, il, por Periodical Website
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