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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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5 results for Friend of Wildlife Vol. 34 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1987
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Record #:
26646
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1980 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation indicated that 93 million Americans were involved in some form of nonconsumptive wildlife related activity. Billions of dollars were spent on feeding, photographing, or identifying wildlife. In a time when farm incomes are dropping, North Carolina farmers are turning to wildlife recreation resources for alternative income.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 34 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1987, p12, il
Record #:
26642
Abstract:
The North Carolina Wildlife Federation launched a new outreach program unique in the state. The program is an environmental canvass which is visiting homes across the state to promote the Federation’s message in water quality conservation and to ask for citizen’s support of its programs.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 34 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1987, p4-5, il
Record #:
26644
Author(s):
Abstract:
Big game can now be hunted legally with a handgun for the first time in North Carolina. Hunters are urged to use a handgun caliber that they know would dispatch the quarry with a single, well-placed shot.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 34 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1987, p7, il
Record #:
26643
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is losing a lot of traditional farm land because farmers can’t afford to stay in business. In the past, small-game has been a natural by-product of agriculture since most farm land provides habitat for small animals. As farm losses continue, so do small-game populations.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 34 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1987, p6, il
Record #:
26645
Author(s):
Abstract:
The first pair of red wolves were released on Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, near Manteo in North Carolina. Specially designed radio telemetry recapture collars were placed on the wolves to monitor their movement.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 34 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1987, p10, il