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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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5 results for Friend O’ Wildlife Vol. 30 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1983
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Record #:
26789
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ted Reed is the quintessential volunteer who has dedicated his time to conservation education. Ted founded the Raleigh Wildlife and Conservation Club and developed programs to teach school children about wildlife conservation and acid rain. He also leads a Boy Scout Troop, which is involved in conservation projects and hunter safety programs.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 30 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1983, p9, por
Record #:
26786
Author(s):
Abstract:
For the first time in several years, North Carolina waterfowl hunters will have the opportunity to take canvasback ducks during a special season in coastal waters. Regulations were also adopted allowing hunters to use handguns for big game during the regular gun seasons.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 30 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1983, p4
Record #:
26787
Author(s):
Abstract:
With changes in the mechanics of hunting, and in view of the ever-critical eye of society on the sport of hunting, it becomes increasingly important for hunters to reassess their attitudes and actions in terms of hunter behavior and ethics. Resources, respect, restraint, and responsibility are four words to always keep in mind.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 30 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1983, p7, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
26788
Author(s):
Abstract:
The gray squirrel is surprisingly, the number one game animal in North Carolina. This small target is challenging but there are several methods to hunt gray squirrels. An ideal time for hunting a squirrel is just after a light rain or during a light drizzle when the wind is calm.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 30 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1983, p8, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
26790
Author(s):
Abstract:
The black duck population has been decreasing by slightly more than one-percent each year. Hunting could be a factor in the decline of the black duck, but habitat loss and the interbreeding with its cousin, the mallard, are more viable causes for the decline.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 30 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1983, p10, il
Subject(s):