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5 results for Endeavors Vol. 22 Issue 2, Winter 2006
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Record #:
25894
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The highest number of hurricanes has occurred in coastal North Carolina, making the state extremely vulnerable to flooding and other disastrous impacts. UNC researchers are conducting studies to learn about community evacuation decisions and disaster response, and to develop models that predict storm surge and ecological changes resulting from hurricanes.
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Record #:
25893
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Tim Marr, assistant professor of American studies, recently came across century-old accounts of American encounters with the Moros, a diverse group of indigenous Muslims in the southern Philippine Islands. According to Marr, the Moro history can teach us a lot about current events in Iraq and advise American foreign-policy.
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25896
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Richard Weisler, an adjunct professor of psychiatry, mapped the locations of cancer deaths and suicides and found they were within proximity to asphalt plants in Salisbury, North Carolina. Hydrogen sulfide, a chemical emitted from asphalt plants, is suspected to affect mood and responses to stress.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Winter 2006, p21-24, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25897
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Edward Cope was a scientist who proposed that animal and plant lineages tend to increase in body size over geological time. Although heavily debated, UNC scientists Joel Kingsolver and David Pfennig suspect Cope’s rule works because things that are larger tend to have higher fitness.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Winter 2006, p30-32, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25895
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Mike Ramsey is a chemist and a pioneer in the field of microfluids. He uses biotechnology to develop microscopic lab tests that can be controlled by computers. Ramsey is currently working on nanofluid technology to sequence DNA.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Winter 2006, p18-20, por Periodical Website
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