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7 results for Coastwatch Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2015
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Record #:
22590
Author(s):
Abstract:
Margaret Garner, a doctoral candidate in East Carolina University's Coastal Resources Management Program, is using the unique environments of the Rachel Carson Reserve to see what might happen to North Carolina's coast if sea level rise continues.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2015, p28-33, il Periodical Website
Record #:
22589
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina oysters are a keystone species for the health of the state's estuaries. Since 2003, a diverse group of stakeholders has worked to develop initiatives related to the protection and restoration of the state's oyster populations.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2015, p18-19, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
22591
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's aquaculture and mariculture industries produce many species that are popular for many dinner tables. Local farms produce trout, catfish, bass, shrimp, and various shellfish that contribute $57 million to the state's economy.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2015, p34-35, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
22587
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although a Raleigh native, John Fear's youth in New Bern put him on the path to being a coastal scientist. Fear fueled his coastal curiosity through academia, field research, resource management, research administration and now as the Deputy Director of North Carolina Sea Grant and the Water Resources Research Institute of the University of North Carolina System.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2015, p6-11, por Periodical Website
Record #:
22588
Author(s):
Abstract:
Only 5.5% of of over 5,000 commercial fishing license holders in North Carolina are women, and although the commercial fishing industry is often seen as a male activity, women's role in sustaining fisheries and fishing communities is unparalleled in many roles.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2015, p12-17, por Periodical Website
Record #:
29020
Author(s):
Abstract:
Derelict crab pots that litter the North Carolina waterways are being used to build oyster reefs. Turning hazards into habitat is one of the goals of this study that examines the ecological characteristics of natural and restored reefs, and provide ideal locations for restoration.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2015, p24-27, il Periodical Website
Record #:
29019
Author(s):
Abstract:
Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Institute of Marine Sciences are working to optimize oyster reef restoration in North Carolina's sounds. This involves a team working to construct reefs and monitor their growth over time.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2015, p20-23, il Periodical Website