NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


4 results for Coastwatch Vol. Issue , Holiday 1999
Currently viewing results 1 - 4
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
4391
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two major hurricanes, Dennis and Floyd, ravaged Eastern Carolina in 1999. While damage to man-made structures can be quickly assessed, damage to the environment over the long- term remains unknown. Early assessments reveal a drop in the oxygen content of the Neuse and other rivers, which can cause fish kills. Also observable is the large amount of freshwater that had flowed into the Pamlico and Core sounds, which promotes the growth of freshwater algae.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 1999, p16-18, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4386
Abstract:
High bacterial levels have closed permanently over 56,000 acres of shellfish beds along the coast. In Carteret County's Jumping Run Creek high levels closed beds except for a few days each year. The Jumping Run Creek Shellfish Restoration Project, started in 1997, seeks to develop water-quality improvement strategies that might reopen polluted beds along the coast.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 1999, p19-23, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4390
Author(s):
Abstract:
The high winds and flooding of the Great Storm of 1899 drove residents of Shackleford Banks and Ca'e (Cape) Banks from their homes forever. Survivors migrated to Morehead City and Harkers Island, where they built new homes and continued their community traditions. Green chronicles the return of their descendants to the Banks to mark the one hundredth anniversary of the storm.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 1999, p6-11, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
4393
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between the state's barrier islands are twenty- two inlets, stretching from Oregon Inlet in the northern Outer Banks to Mad Inlet near the South Carolina border. Inlets are more than just openings where the ocean flows in and out. They are dynamic places were the tidal currents try to deepen the channel while ocean waves carry sand to fill it up. Whichever force is dominant determines whether the inlet widens or closes up.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 1999, p24-25, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):