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5 results for Coastwatch Vol. Issue , Early Summer 2004
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Record #:
6714
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Frying Pan Shoals Light Tower stands about twenty miles off the coast in an area of treacherous water called Frying Pan Shoals. Light towers are like lighthouses in water. The towers replaced lightships; now the towers are being replaced by buoys that transmit weather data that can be read online. Green discusses the history of lightships and light towers and the soon-to-be dismantled Frying Pan tower.
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Record #:
6715
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A Fishery Resource Grant project to track turtles in the Pamlico Sound is also providing data for a marine life census that stretches around the world. The Pamlico project is designed to determine movements of loggerheads and other turtles in an effort to reduce the number of turtles caught in flounder gill nets. Using a single satellite, the project tracked forty-five turtles, making it one of the world's largest turtle-tracking studies. Mosher gives an update of the project.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Early Summer 2004, p23-25, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
6713
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Ospreys, also known as sea hawks, are now a familiar sight along the North Carolina coast. Before the use of DDT was banned in 1972, the pesticide got into the food chain of ospreys; this caused them to lay thin-shelled eggs that affected the survival rate of the young. Since the banning, ospreys have been increasing in numbers. This fish-eating species mates for life and returns to the same nest year after year.
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Record #:
6712
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Green discusses the new federal permit that is required for private recreational fishing boats that target highly migratory species, or HMS. The regulations cover species including sharks, tunas, swordfishes, and billfishes. The permits are required for anglers doing catch-and-release fishing or landing the fish.
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Record #:
6711
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North Carolina's state-owned ferry fleet ranks second to the state of Washington's, the nation's largest. Twenty-three vessels sail seven routes year-round, some across rivers, others across sounds. A unique feature of the ferries is that each one is emblazoned with the colors and logos or mascots of the sixteen schools within the University of North Carolina System, and other private state universities and colleges.
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