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4 results for Business North Carolina Vol. 24 Issue 11, Nov 2004
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Record #:
6893
Author(s):
Abstract:
Will Morgan, executive director of the North Carolina chapter of the Coastal Conservation Association, worked with the North Carolina General Assembly to help pass legislation creating a saltwater fishing license. The issue, which had been debated for over a decade, passed in 2004. North Carolina was the only state between Texas and Delaware that did not have this license. The license is a user fee and costs $15 annually or $1 for a seven-day permit. Fees will be used for marine projects and scholarships for students pursuing marine science degrees.
Record #:
6892
Author(s):
Abstract:
Shane Cooper's company, DeFeet International, Inc., makes socks for cyclists, runners, and snow skiers. The sock design uses DuPont's synthetic CoolMax yarn to draw moisture away from the skin. In 2001, after nine years in business, Cooper's plant in Hildebran burned down. The company was back in business by January 2002 and now employs a staff of forty. Copper buys nearly all his thread from North Carolina manufacturers, because as, he says, of “proximity, quality, and pride.”
Record #:
6891
Author(s):
Abstract:
Pete DeVita is president and CEO of Wilmington-based Cape Fear Riverwood Corp. The company recovers from the bottom of the Cape Fear River centuries-old logs that were floated downriver by loggers from the late 1700s to early 1900s. Many of the logs sank along the route and are rare old-growth cypress, loblolly pine and longleaf pine between three and five hundred years old. Once cut, the wood is used in flooring, furniture, and house building.
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Record #:
6894
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many people associate Durham with tobacco, but few know that the world's most powerful jet engine is built there. GE Transportation-Aircraft Engines builds the GE90, an engine with 115,000 pounds of thrusting power that is equivalent to the power of forty corporate jets. The jets are built mostly by hand on an assembly line that moves about three feet. Most engines power commercial airliners, but some are used by the military.