NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


7 results for Brimleyana Vol. Issue 17, Dec 1991
Currently viewing results 1 - 7
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
30046
Author(s):
Abstract:
Notropis chlorocephalus, Notropis chiliticus, and Hybopsis hypsinotus are three species of fish found in the Peedee drainage and the Dan River of North Carolina. During a study of nest association among North American minnows in 1987-1988, these three fish species spawned over the nest of bluehead chubs (Nocomis leptocephalus). The advantage of spawning in nests of other fish species may be increased egg survivorship with no costs of parental care.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 17, Dec 1991, p77-88, bibl Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
30048
Abstract:
The Carolina Madtom (Noturus furiosus) is a catfish endemic to the Tar and Neuse River drainages in North Carolina. Because of its endemicity and relatively limited distribution, this fish became a candidate for pre-listing studies by the Office of Endangered Species, United States Fish and Wildlife Service. This study analyzed the fish’s biology and distribution from 1982 to 1984.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 17, Dec 1991, p57-86, il, map, bibl Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
30047
Abstract:
Cooter and redbelly turtles are aquatic species that inhabit the southeastern United States. Taxonomic relationships in the genus Pseudemys have been unclear due to an extensive history of species-subspecies revisions. This study analyzed and compared morphological characteristics of various turtle species in North Carolina and Virginia drainage systems.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 17, Dec 1991, p105-135, il, map Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
30044
Abstract:
The largest population of red-cockaded woodpeckers in North Carolina is located in the Sandhills. This study observed the bird’s foraging habits in the Sandhills Game Land for one year. Most foraging took place on living pines as has been reported elsewhere.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 17, Dec 1991, p37-52, il, bibl Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
30045
Abstract:
River otters were transplanted from North Carolina and Maryland into the West Fork River of West Virginia during February and April, 1987. Birth of young and mating by the released otters occurred within two months of release. This represents the only known occurrence of birth during the same year following transplanting.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 17, Dec 1991, p53-55, bibl Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
30043
Abstract:
This study surveyed bats in the Great Dismal Swamp, a forested wetland located in southeastern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina. Before this survey, only five species of bats were known in this area. Observations from bats collected in this study yield four new species in the Dismal Swamp area.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 17, Dec 1991, p17-25, bibl Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
30042
Author(s):
Abstract:
A survey of ants and cockroaches present near suburban houses was conducted in Wake County, North Carolina. Observations from trapped insects show twenty-six species of ants, and indicate that the smoky brown cockroach (Periplaneta fuliginosa) is a prevalent pest that occurs both indoors and outdoors.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 17, Dec 1991, p9-16, bibl Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text: