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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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348 results for "WNC Magazine"
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Record #:
22406
Abstract:
The summer only has so many weekends to pack activities into. The authors describe twenty-one weekends of things to do in Western North Carolina. These include shopping in Swain and Graham counties, rafting and kayaking on the Nantahala River, attending the music festival in Brevard, and strolling through some art studios in Buncombe, McDowell, Mitchell, and Yanncey counties.
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Record #:
23741
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The demands of early pioneer life in the Blue Ridge Mountains shaped North Carolina's Plott hound, a loyal hunting companion with the ability to track, corner, or tree an animal ten times its size.
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Record #:
23810
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A solar field in Buncombe County, North Carolina makes use of wasted landfill field space. The facility was completed by FLS Energy, who aimed to produce clean energy from the landfill.
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Record #:
23622
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Tawana Weicker of Polk County began developing biofuel from spent cooking oil in 2007. While searching for a use for the by-product, glycerin, Weicker created soap, which she now sells under the name Warhouse. This invention has sparked educational programs in Polk County as well as at nearby universities and is inspiring biofuels researchers.
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Record #:
23824
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Eunice Kathleen Waymon (1933-2003), the jazz singer known better by her stage name Nina Simone, was born in Tryon, North Carolina. Though the original house of Simone's childhood still stands, it is soon to be sold, causing the fate of this historic home to be uncertain.
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WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 5 Issue 3, May 2011, p26-29, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
23762
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Eco-friendly houses are becoming more popular, but putting a price on them can be difficult for many reasons. The author discusses the challenges with appraising eco-friendly houses.
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Record #:
23788
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Family farms are becoming more popular. One example of this return to traditional ways of life is Joe Deal, who gave up his post-collegiate job to become a full-time third-generation farmer in Franklin County, North Carolina.
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Record #:
22276
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Henry River Mill Village was an abandoned and weathering collection of twenty-some buildings until Hollywood came calling to use it for scenes in the blockbuster movie, The Hunger Games. Now there is a growing interest in preserving what is left of the village. Elliston recounts some of the village's history.
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Record #:
23784
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Ron and Susanne Joyner give rare and all-but-forgotten apple trees a chance to thrive by collecting, propagating, and selling heirloom apple trees.
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Record #:
22273
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The first broom-making machine went into production in 1845. Prior to that brooms were all handmade, usually from broomcorn. In his workshop at the old general store in Big Sandy Mush in Leicester, NC, Marlow Gates keeps the fine art of broom-making alive and well. He studied design at NC State University then, after graduation, returned home. Gates is one of a hundred or so broom-makers left in the country.
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WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 6 Issue 6, Aug 2012, p22-23, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
23794
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Lisbeth and Don Cooper founded CooperRiis in Polk County, a holistic community-based approach to treatment, as an alternative to the mainstream mental health system.
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Record #:
22405
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Mitchell Hicks, Principal Chief of the Eastern Band of Cherokee, \"feels it is the responsibility of his generation to protect, preserve and revitalize the Cherokee native language.\" Clarke describes how this is being accomplished. One way is to develop a new generation of speakers starting with the young. Language immersion means young children up to three years of age hear only Cherokee all day in classrooms on the reservation. Plans call for the program to include reading and writing Cherokee until the oldest students reach the fifth grade.
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Record #:
22271
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Dr. Lucius B. Morse purchased Chimney Rock, a 2,280-foot tall, 535 million-year-old monolith, in 1902. Although a stairway to the top had been in use for the previous seventeen years, it was wearing down. Lucas hired Guilford Nanney, a carpenter-builder, to build a new trail system. Before he was hired, Nanney had built houses. Several of his Queen Anne-style homes in Rutherford County are on the National Historic Register. Miles recounts his work at Chimney Rock.
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Record #:
22221
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\"Truly magnificent gardens need time and attention to flourish--coaxed and nurtured by guiding hands and verdant vision.\" Milner takes readers on a walk through Peter and Jasmin Gentling's garden, called Blue Briar Garden located on Sunset Mountain in Asheville. They have cultivated it over the last forty years. The garden serves as a backdrop to their home, historic Blue Briar Cottage, built in 1906 and purchased by them in 1971.
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Record #:
23828
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Anne Martin created Mountain Moss Enterprises, which specializes in creating eco-friendly moss gardens and sustainable landscapes in Western North Carolina.
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