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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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604 results for "Tar Heel Junior Historian"
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Record #:
41166
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Abstract:
The author’s interview with a North Carolina State English professor uncovered the faint resemblance between the dialect popularized in movies and real life pirates like Stede Bonnet. What many may regard as “pirate talk” was popularized by English actor Robert Newton. How many pirates actually spoke reflected an Outer Banks residency or origin from a variety of countries, such as France, China, and Spain.
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Record #:
41173
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Among the Queen Anne’s Revenge retrievable items was a page’s fragments. Examination concluded the page fragments came from Edward Cooke’s A Voyage to the South Sea. As for why it was in a cannon on Blackbeard’s flagship, the author speculates the crew was making cannon wadding or a statement about Captain Woodes Rogers, a well-known pirate hunter.
Record #:
41171
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Abstract:
The detail of cannons focused on in this article was markings, which revealed information such as their size, weight, ownership, and origin. The importance of cannons can also be inferred by the estimated number of this weapon on board the Queen Anne’s Revenge, between 3-40.
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Record #:
28914
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Abstract:
During World War I, North Carolinians were affected in many ways. Men, women, and children stepped up to help out the cause in a variety of ways. Many joined the war effort as soldiers, bases were created in Fayetteville, Raleigh, Charlotte, and Hillsborough, people bought war bonds, children were encouraged to help garden, women joined organizations like the Red Cross, and North Carolina’s wartime industry brought jobs and money to the state.
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Record #:
28913
Abstract:
Kiffin Yates Rockwell (1892-1916) was a North Carolinian who volunteered to help fight for the Allies during World War I before the United States entered the war. Rockwell flew for France in an air squadron known as the Lafayette Escadrille as part of the French Foreign Legion. Rockwell’s personal history before the war and his death during the war are detailed.
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Record #:
28916
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Abstract:
The impact the Women’s Land Army of America had on the war effort during World War I is detailed. The idea for the group originally started in Great Britain before being adopted in America. The group encouraged women known as “farmerettes” to volunteer by helping plant, grow, or harvest crops during the war. This group helped the Suffrage Movement and the history of the group before, during, and after the war is detailed.
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Record #:
28959
Author(s):
Abstract:
During World War I, more than 2,300 German citizens were housed in camp in Hot Springs, NC by the US Government. The government feared the Germans might be spies and interned them in the mountains. The Germans were not soldiers and lived in harmony with the local people. The history of the situation is briefly described.
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Record #:
28958
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Women who served in the Army Nurse Corps during World War I at Base Hospital 65 in Brest, France share their stories. 90 of the 100 nurses stationed at the hospital were from North Carolina. Over the course of 14 months, the nurses treated nearly 40,000 soldiers. The history of the nurses of Base Hospital 65 is detailed.
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Record #:
28988
Abstract:
More than 20,000 black North Carolinians were called to fight for “democracy” in World War I while being denied equal rights back home. The soldiers faced discrimination at home and in the military. Stories of their service and how they were treated within the Army, by the British soldiers, and by the French soldiers are told.
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