NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


95 results for "SCHS Studies"
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 7
Next
Record #:
29384
Author(s):
Abstract:
A study conducted in 1980 examined inpatient utilization of nonfederal short-stay general hospitals by North Carolina residents. This report presents the hospital utilization rates for selected diagnosis groups and for selected surgical procedures by county of residents of the patients. Results show that county hospital use rates vary between Medicare patients and Medicaid patients.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 24, Feb 1983, p1-23, bibl, f
Record #:
29408
Abstract:
This report was produced in response to thirty quantifiable national health objectives for which comparable and reliable North Carolina data were available. It is meant to inform health planners, policy makers, and the health community at large of state and national trends and the statistical prospects for meeting each of the thirty objectives, based on trends of the recent past.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 44, Feb 1988, p1-83, il, map, bibl, f
Record #:
2043
Abstract:
During the period 1977-79, only seven states had higher house fire death rates than North Carolina. Providing protection from injuries by modifying the home environment would help to reduce house fire mortality.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 46, Sept 1988, p1-11, il, bibl
Record #:
3573
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1994 N.C. Birth Cohort Survey, conducted by the State Center for Health Statistics, studied the June, 1994, resident birth population at ages two to four months. Data included infant sleeping positions and domestic violence during pregnancy.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 107, Sept 1997, p1-7, il
Record #:
29409
Author(s):
Abstract:
For the period 1978-1986 in North Carolina, nonwhite abortion was negatively correlated with the fertility rate and the fetal and neonatal death rates of nonwhite infants born in the same year. The correlation varied by age, education, income, marital, and birth-order categories.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 45, June 1988, p1-12, bibl, f
Record #:
2040
Abstract:
In N.C., women most likely to have received prenatal care were married, employed, wealthier, first-time mothers. Also, women who received primary care from a private physician or health department were more likely to receive some prenatal care.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 48, Feb 1989, p1-16, il, bibl
Record #:
29395
Author(s):
Abstract:
Congenital malformations are a public health concern due in part to their ranking as a leading cause of infant mortality. This study utilized North Carolina death certificate data to provide a general description of mortalities due to congenital malformations. A similar examination assessed reports of malformations on birth certificates.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 31, Apr 1984, p1-7, il, bibl, f
Record #:
29407
Abstract:
This article reviews data on alcohol-related morbidity in North Carolina and addresses the question of alcohol-related mortality. The combination of alcohol and cigarettes contributes to the development of cancers, while excessive alcohol use is a major factor leading to accidental injury and death.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 41, July 1986, p1-13, bibl, f
Record #:
29412
Abstract:
In North Carolina, most county health departments provide both family planning and prenatal care services to eligible women. The rate of continuity between these two services was assessed using data from the North Carolina Health Services Information System (HSIS).
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 49, Mar 1989, p1-7, bibl, f
Record #:
5505
Author(s):
Abstract:
In this study the prevalence of high neonatal risk among very-low-birth-weight babies (VLBW) who were referred to North Carolina's Infant/Toddler Program and those VLBW babies who were not was compared. Also compared were the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of the mothers.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 127, Nov 2001, p1-8, il, bibl
Subject(s):
Record #:
29484
Abstract:
Obesity is recognized as a serious public health epidemic and a significant underlying cause of morbidity and mortality. This study examined medical care expenditure and utilization patterns in a sample of adolescents in North Carolina enrolled in Medicaid. Results show negative health consequences of overweight as early as adolescence.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 151, Aug 2006, p1-8, bibl, f
Record #:
3574
Author(s):
Abstract:
The death rate for breast cancer in the state declined eleven percent between 1986 and 1995. Survival rates were higher among whites than minorities. Factors for the decline included improved health status for women.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 108, Sept 1997, p1-13, il, bibl
Record #:
29510
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cancer survival rates have not been tracked by the North Carolina Central Cancer Registry, largely due to the insufficient resources necessary to actively follow up with patients after diagnosis. This study compared survival rates for North Carolina patients followed via passive methods to survival rates reported by the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, which actively follows patients after diagnosis.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 163, June 2010, p1-7, il, bibl, f
Record #:
29465
Abstract:
This study examined current differences in North Carolina between African-American and white women in cervical cancer incidence, stage at diagnosis, treatment, and mortality. Results suggest the need for increased preventative cervical cancer screening for African-American women, so that cancer cases can be detected at an earlier stage.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 134, Aug 2002, p1-5, bibl, f
Record #:
4119
Author(s):
Abstract:
Asthma is a common illness among children, through the age of fourteen, and it is one of the most important reasons children are hospitalized in the state. From 1995 to 1997, asthma hospitalizations averaged 6,500 per year. The illness rate is higher in rural areas than in urban ones.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 113, Mar 1999, p1-10, il, bibl
Subject(s):