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9 results for Prenatal care
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Record #:
1893
Abstract:
Pregnant women who participated in the special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) were compared to pregnant women not in the program. The results were favorable for the WIC participants.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 55, Mar 1991, p1-8, il, bibl
Record #:
2465
Abstract:
Inadequate weight gain by mothers during pregnancy is second only to smoking in predicting low birth weight among Afro-Americans and non-Hispanic whites. Other factors like lack of education were also studied during the 1988-1991 research.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 95, Aug 1995, p1-17, il
Record #:
5313
Author(s):
Abstract:
This study's purpose was \"to examine the level of folic acid knowledge and intake among North Carolina women who have recently given birth.\" One conclusion drawn by the authors was that the percentage of women in the state taking folic acid prior to pregnancy is low.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 126, June 2001, p1-8, il, bibl
Subject(s):
Record #:
24875
Abstract:
Family planning can have a great effect on birth outcomes. The weight of the baby is a big factor that can change based on use of family planning. In addition, pregnancy rates are also affected by the use of family planning.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. 62 Issue , March 1992, p1-11, il, bibl, f
Record #:
24891
Abstract:
Maternal smoking can cause harm to an infant in many ways. There is an increased risk for SIDS, and babies are more likely to have a low birth rate which can lead to health complications later in life. If women were to stop smoking during pregnancy, the infant mortality rate would drop significantly.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 135, Aug 2002, p1-6, bibl, f
Record #:
29412
Abstract:
In North Carolina, most county health departments provide both family planning and prenatal care services to eligible women. The rate of continuity between these two services was assessed using data from the North Carolina Health Services Information System (HSIS).
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 49, Mar 1989, p1-7, bibl, f
Record #:
29406
Author(s):
Abstract:
The impact of a comprehensive prenatal care program on the birthweights of infants born to low-income women in North Carolina was assessed. Women receiving prenatal care at the Guilford County public health department were compared to women on Medicaid, who received prenatal care mainly from private-practice physicians.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 39, Mar 1986, p1-11, bibl, f
Record #:
29429
Abstract:
The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) provides supplemental food and nutrition education to low-income or nutritionally at-risk women, infants and young children. This North Carolina study examined prenatal WIC participants and non-participants, and compared Medicaid births, birth weight and Medicaid newborn costs.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 122, Nov 2000, p1-9, bibl, f
Record #:
29487
Abstract:
The North Carolina Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) survey has been conducted since 1997 to help find out why some babies are born healthy and others are not. This report summarizes survey information and comments collected from mothers in 2004 and 2005. Topics were on prenatal care, folic acid use, breastfeeding, smoking, alcohol use, postpartum blues and depression, toxemia of pregnancy, Medicaid, and satisfaction with prenatal services.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 153, May 2007, p1-13, bibl, f