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1246 results for "North Carolina Historical Review"
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Record #:
19538
Abstract:
The Aycock Memorial was built to honor state Governor Charles Brantley Aycock. Aycock Memorial Committee members unveiled the monument in Capitol Square, Raleigh on Thursday, March 13, 1924. A complete program of events and participants is included.
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Record #:
19545
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War Camp Community Service worked jointly with other organizations like the Red Cross and the Salvation Army to enrich the lives of soldiers and sailors stationed in camps across the state by boosting morale through social events. These groups were organized throughout the state and specifics concerning members and activities of each are included for: Charlotte, Southport, Wilmington, Asheville, Hot Springs, Waynesville, Hendersonville, Durham, Morehead City, Elizabeth City, Winston-Salem, Greensboro, New Bern, Goldsboro, Raleigh, and Fayetteville.
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19544
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The North Carolina Friends Society had a long history of attempting to extend educational rights to African American slaves and their ancestors. Reviewing meeting minutes from this group, the author recounts the various efforts to education African Americans dating as far back as 1814.
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Record #:
19546
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Part IV, the third appearing in volume 1 issue 3 of this journal, of Colonel Pratt's diary reprinted here and covering his service from August 16, 1918 to September 29, 1918.
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Record #:
19565
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Part IV and V in this series, presents three documents - \"The Petition of Reuben Searcy and Others\" (1759), George Sim's \"Address to the People of Granville,\" and Hermon Husband's \"Remarks on Religion.\" Both historic documents record incidents of property taxation in the Granville District. The first document is a complaint lodged against Robert Jones Jr., Attorney General of the state, for over taxation and the latter a public speech addressed to Granville County Residents to join together and overthrow local government. The third document is a reprint of Husband's 1761 pamphlet concerning his personal opinions about the connection between religion and politics.
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Record #:
19564
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In 1815, public schools taught state geography and history interchangeably, the two subjects not yet distinguished as independent topics. Teachers would have used one of three textbooks: Guthrie's \"A New Geographical, Historical, and Commercial Grammar and the Present State of the Several Kingdoms of the World\"; Morse's \"Geography Made Easy, Being an Abridgement of the American Universal Geography\"; or Adams' \"Geography, or A Description of the World in Three Parts.\" These texts were chosen to discuss how geography was presented to school children in the early 19th century and the development and curriculum changes a century later.
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Record #:
19570
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In this re-printing of his December 4, 1924 address before the State Literary and Historical Association, Jackson discusses a criticism of the post-confederate American south by essayist H.L. Mencken in which the region is described as completely lacking in culture and civilization.
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Record #:
19568
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The history of the Piedmont Railroad Company begins with the proposal of a rail line between Greensboro and Danville, Virginia proposed in November 1848. Almost fourteen years later, the Piedmont Railroad Company was chartered in February 1862. This article reports on the legislative battle to approve the rail connection, logistics of establishing the railway, and the financial outcome of the company's operations.
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Record #:
19569
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The eighth and ninth installment in this series presents a reprint of Hermon Husband's \"An Impartial Relation of the First Rise and Cause of the Recent Differences in Public Affairs\" (1770) and \"Fan for Fanning and a Touchstone for Tryon\" (1771). Both offer an account of complaints of many Regulators during the Colonial Period.
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19563
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Early colonists attempted to establish roads and highways in eastern North Carolina but inhabitants of the Albemarle region depended largely on the area's natural waterways for transportation. Documentation of colonial transportation avenues is limited but the article outlines the history of travel throughout the region during the early colonial phase. The article expounds on early types of watercraft and the difficulties of travel over land.
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Record #:
19567
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The article's author presents a brief biography of Samuel A'Court Ashe. Ashe was a prominent figure in the state's history serving as a soldier, jurist, legislator, editor, and most importantly historian. He edited the 1904 seven volume series Biographical History of North Carolina from Colonial Times to the Present and wrote his own two volume state history entitled simply History of North Carolina.
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Record #:
19566
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Provincial Governor George Burrington, 1731, spent much of his term in office in a controversy concerning the collection of quit rents. Debate between Johnston and his detractors is reprinted here with records beginning March 29, 1735 through 1750.
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Record #:
19574
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Randolph Shotwell served time at three different Federal prisons during his lifetime and recorded his experiences at each. Captured during the Civil War in 1864 he was first confined at Point Lookout, Maryland, then was moved to Fort Delaware where he remained until the end of the war. In 1871 he was convicted on false evidence in the Ku Klux Conspiracy and sentenced to six years at the Federal Penitentiary in Albany, NY before being pardoned by President Grant after serving two years. An examination of his time at Point Lookout is presented in this first installment.
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Record #:
19571
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The first article in the series, \"Some North Carolina Tracts of the Eighteenth Century,\" includes a re-printing of the ca. 1740 pamphlet, \"A True and Faithful Narrative of the Proceedings of the House of Burgesses of North Carolina,\" describing an attempt to impeach the colony's Chief Justice William Smith in 1739.
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Record #:
19578
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William Borden was a shipbuilder from Rhode Island who relocated to Carteret County where he established a shipbuilding business on the Newport River. His \"Address to the Inhabitants of North Carolina,\" addresses issues of commercial conditions and trade and monetary policies in the colony. It includes a plan for sound currency and a criticism of the Assembly of 1744.
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