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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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58 results for "North Carolina Archaeology"
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Record #:
35406
Abstract:
This article is a lead in for “The Last of the Iroquois Potters,” M.R. Harrington’s 1909 study of traditional Cherokee ceramics produced during the Qualla periods in what is now Cherokee, NC. Riggs and Rodning’s article focused on other archaeologists from Harrington’s time and characteristic features of pottery produced particularly during the Qualla periods. Also noted were other discoveries of Iroquois pottery in Southeast regions such as Georgia and the continuation of this pottery’s production into the twenty first century.
Record #:
35113
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This article was a lead in for “The Last of the Iroquois Potters,” M.R. Harrington’s 1909 study of traditional Cherokee ceramics produced during the Qualla periods in what is now Cherokee, NC. Brett Riggs and Christopher Rodning’s article focused on other archaeologists from Harrington’s time and characteristic features of pottery produced particularly during the Qualla periods. Also noted were other discoveries of Iroquois pottery in Southeast regions such as Georgia and the continuation of this pottery’s production into the twenty first century.
Record #:
35211
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Andrew Madsen's article chronicled the findings of “The Road to Hope” excavation at Hope Plantation in Bertie County, occupied during the nineteenth century by the David Stone family. Undertaken in 2001-2002 by Coastal Carolina Research Inc., this study sought to better comprehend slaves’ retention of African cultural beliefs and practices within the development of a North Carolinian Creolized culture. This goal was met through the examination of Colonoware ceramic fragments, which were also compared to recoveries from Virginia and South Carolina Plantation sites.
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Record #:
18628
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Through an opportunity afforded by a survey conducted by the North Carolina Department of Transportation, archaeologists some of the most remote and culturally conservative portions of the traditional Cherokee lands in the western part of the State. Through ethnographic and archaeological investigations, researchers now better understand the effect the natural environment had on the cultural characteristics of the Cherokee in this area.
Source:
North Carolina Archaeology (NoCar E 78 S55 S6), Vol. 56 Issue , Oct 2007, p96-117, map, bibl, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
35210
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This article’s discussion of cultural behaviors of smoking in Southeastern NC Colonial society and culture built from articles written about fifteen excavations between the 1960s to the present. Discussion of the recent excavation work at Brunswick Town focused on new discoveries of white clay pipe fragments uncovered. This encouraged a reevaluation starting in 1997 of earlier findings, done through the use of methods such as regression formulas and pipe stem dating.
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Record #:
18591
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Site 31CB114 is a prehistoric site located on the broad ridgetop south of the Cape Fear River in Columbus County. The ceramics at the site represent a mixture of decorative and technological attributes typically found within the North and South Carolina Coastal Plain. Radiocarbon dating concludes that the production of ceramics at this site occurred as much as 1500 years earlier than previously expected for the southern Coastal Plain of North Carolina.
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Record #:
18605
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Milton Perry conducted the first archaeological research at Fort Macon as part of the 1952-1953 restoration project. Perry's investigations are compared with subsequent archaeological projects at Fort Macon State Park and show the relevance of archaeological contributions to the study of the Civil War.
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Record #:
20372
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It has been argued that historical archaeology began in North Carolina with the work of Talcott Williams in the 19th century in search of the Roanoke settlements or with the work of James Sprunt at Russellborough near Brunswick Town. Beaman argues that historical archaeology did not flourish in the state until the mid 20th century, when Morely Jeffers Williams conducted the first archaeological investigation into the opulent pre-Revolutionary home of William Tryon in New Bern.
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Record #:
18593
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From 1952 to 1958, Morley Jeffers Williams conducted extensive archaeological investigations at Tryon Palace in New Bern. These excavations provided information that guided the interior and exterior restoration and reconstruction of the buildings and other architectural features.
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Record #:
35204
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This site in Moore County, sponsored by the Department of Transportation and taking place in 2002-2003, intended to determine reasons for the variation of projectile points. Discussed were the excavation and stratigraphy of the Horses Grazing Site. Factors noted by Joel Gunn and Irwin Royner of the hunters were reasons for choosing this area, the time periods in which horse grazing was at its height, the types of arrowheads manufactured, and Horse Grazing point morphology. The conclusion derived was that game hunters migrated in response to a decrease of megafauna in the area. Data illustrating point measurements is contained in Appendix A.
Record #:
35200
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Adam Marshall discussed newly discovered types of interior impressions for ceramics, distinct and uninform interval fabric impressed. Based on the collected data, the author concluded that previously undetected typological relationships between the White Oak and Colington ceramic series could be determined.
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Record #:
35197
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As an introduction to this periodical series of articles, Herbert discussed William Haag, an archaeologist who completed an excavation series of coastal sites between 1954-1955. His endeavor paved the road for several future archaeological related activities in Coastal NC. Highlighted was his descriptions of testing and surveying sites along the northern coast of North Carolina. His work laid a foundation for the prehistoric ceramic sequence still in use at the time of this journal’s publication. Also noted among his contributions to the field was a symposium organized for the fifty fifth annual Southern Archaeological Conference. This Conference yielded six of the articles published in this volume.
Record #:
20376
Abstract:
Archaeological work done at the Marine Corps Auxiliary Landing Field (MCALF) Bogue, at Taylor Bay on the mainland side of Bogue Sound in Carteret County has unearthed a change in prehistoric ceramic chronology for coastal North Carolina, presenting a possible new ceramic type for the region.
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North Carolina Archaeology (NoCar E 78 S55 S6), Vol. 49 Issue , Oct 2000, p78-92, il, map, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
20367
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Excavations near Hamps's Landing on the Lower Cape Fear River in New Hanover County have revealed a previously undefined type of ceramics. The limestone-tempered, fabric-pressed sherds have, until now, been unidentified in coastal North Carolina.
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North Carolina Archaeology (NoCar E 78 S55 S6), Vol. 46 Issue , Oct 1997, p91-108, il, map, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
8451
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On May 29, 1664, colonists arrived in what is now Brunswick County to establish a town. Most of the arrivals were English. They chose a site on a low knoll at the mouth of Town Creek, a large tributary of the Lower Cape Fear River. Considerations in selecting this site would have included navigation, anchorage, defense, and centrality of position within the colony. The settlement was intended to be an agricultural one. By the fall of 1667, the colony was abandoned. Forces far removed from the colony contributed to its decline, including failure to obtain essential patents and charters from the king and lords proprietors, England�s war with Holland, and internal squabbles among the colony�s backers. Loftfield discusses what excavations reveal about the colony.
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