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156 results for "Journal of the New Bern Historical Society"
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Record #:
9230
Abstract:
For forty years after King Charles II granted a charter to the eight Lords Proprietor for Carolina, little serious effort was made to establish churches and clergymen there. This was because the population was sparse and scattered along the northern Carolina coast. Also many of the colonists were religious dissenters who did not wish to see the Anglican Church established with all its pomp and ceremony. Skaggs discusses the problems the colony dealt with in attracting clergy.
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Record #:
9231
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Lore describes a map of New Bern during the Civil War. The map hangs in the Attmore-Oliver House and was painted by Private George W. Williams of the 44th Massachusetts Infantry. Measuring 7.5 inches wide and 10.5 inches tall, the map depicts all the major streets in New Bern, the landmark churches of the town, and the extensive wharves that lined the shores of the two rivers.
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Record #:
28102
Abstract:
The history of West Street Colored Library in New Bern started in 1936 by six citizens including men and women, both black and white from respected civic, religious, and educational backgrounds. The library prospered and grew until 1973 when it was turned over to the Climbers Club, now called the Charlotte Rhone Cultural Center.
Record #:
28101
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Battlefield tour guides from the New Bern Historical Society are preparing a manual which presents the script that will be used by guides in developing their own oral presentations for the five stations along the battlefield tour trail. Included in the manual is detailed background data about the battle, a bibliography, and related resources for further information.
Record #:
28103
Abstract:
Miss Charlotte Rhone was a founder and the third president of the Climbers Club of New Bern, a non-profit organization of African American women. Rhone was also the first black registered nurse in North Carolina and the first black social worker in Craven County.
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Record #:
28165
Abstract:
The brick smokehouse built in 1847 behind the Attmore-Oliver House in New Bern has contributed to the interpretation of the house and social life history. People had a smokehouse because it was used to prepare ham, a resource which represented the peak of gentrified high status. Brick was used to reduce the incident of fire and also reduce stealing.
Record #:
28164
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John McLellan, a member of the New Bern Planning and Zoning Board, shares his thoughts and predictions about New Bern in the next twenty-five years. He discusses future growth patterns, development, and issues which may temper growth.
Record #:
28163
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Abstract:
A stained glass window of Christ Church in New Bern serves as a memorial honoring Dr. Isaac Hughes and his family. The Hughes Family gave considerable attention and means to the improvement of New Bern throughout the nineteenth century.
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Record #:
28162
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The Climbers Club of New Bern was organized in 1921 by nine prominent African American women. The club’s purpose was to unite New Bern citizens by sponsoring activities for women, and to encourage things that make citizens a better and broader group of people.
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Record #:
39472
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An endeavor undertaken by a sixth grade class at Epiphany School, its yield was the preservation of the Bryan-Fordham Cemetery. Included were a description of their preservation activities, individuals discovered in the cemetery; research sources, such as a local public library; their dream that the cemetery will be included on the New Bern Tour of Cemeteries. Included also were a gravestone identification table, map showing a layout of the graves in Bryan-Fordham Cemetery, and photo of this sixth grade class.
Record #:
8081
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Abstract:
New Bern has been the seat of a United States District Court since the establishment of the District of North Carolina by Act of Congress on June 4, 1790. Stephens describes the many changes in the housing of the court during the past 216 years. The court's current residence is in a courthouse that was dedicated in December 1934. Over the past decade maintenance work has stabilized the building. Stephens discusses work now in progress to upgrade and modernize the courthouse to bring it into the twenty-first century.
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Record #:
8080
Abstract:
From its founding, New Bern was an ideal place for a port. Ships brought goods in using Ocracoke and Old Topsail inlets, but ships coming in at Old Topsail had to travel around Carteret County and Cedar Island to get to and from New Bern. This added time to the voyages. A plan was put forth in 1766 to dig a canal to connect the Neuse River to Old Topsail Inlet. Travel time for the ships would be cut in half, and trade would increase. The ideal place to dig a canal was between Clubfoot Creek and Harlowe Creek. White discusses the canal's progress after the General Assembly enacted a law to build the canal in 1766 down to present-day.
Source:
Journal of the New Bern Historical Society (NoCar F 264 N5 J66), Vol. 19 Issue 1, May 2006, p3-14, map, bibl, f
Record #:
8082
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Tryon Palace was constructed in New Bern between 1767 and 1770. The stately mansion, the seat of Royal Governor William Tryon, was considered the most elegant government building in English America. In 1798, it burned to the ground and was rebuilt from the original plans in the 1950s. Ruckart describes how the land, on which the original Tryon Palace had stood, was used in the intervening years.
Source:
Journal of the New Bern Historical Society (NoCar F 264 N5 J66), Vol. 19 Issue 1, May 2006, p21-32, il, map, f
Record #:
8091
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Abstract:
After the Civil War, white and African American physicians, lawyers, educators, business, and religious leaders in New Bern participated in the local economy, society, and politics. By 1910, Jim Crow laws had changed this, and black businesses no longer were located near white businesses. By the 1940s, African American businesses had been concentrated in the Five Points section. Hipps discusses how the civil rights movement changed New Bern educationally and economically.
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