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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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338 results for "Friend of Wildlife"
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Record #:
7538
Abstract:
Among the winners of the 2003 North Carolina Wildlife Federation's Governor's Achievement Award are Dr. Wilson Laney of Raleigh, Wildlife Conservationist of the Year; David S. Lee of Raleigh, Conservationist of the Year; Dr. Michael E. Dorcas of Davidson, Environmental Educator of the Year; and John Ferguson III of White Oak, Wildlife Enforcement Officer of the Year.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 52 Issue 1, Spring 2004, p5
Record #:
7540
Abstract:
Wildlife and Industry Together, or WAIT, is an innovative program that brings industry and state and local conservation groups together to create wildlife habitats on industrial and commercial lands. The most recent sites to become WAIT certified are Vulcan Construction Materials' Gold Hill Quarry; Hedrick Industries' Grove Stone and Sand Quarry; and Progress Energy's Lee Plant in Goldsboro.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 52 Issue 1, Spring 2004, p6
Subject(s):
Record #:
26348
Author(s):
Abstract:
Volunteer anglers and paddlers participated in a study to evaluate stream flow on the Catawba River and assess the effects on fishing potential. The results will be used as part of Duke Power’s licensing process to continue operation of Linville Dam hydropower facility.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 52 Issue 3, Fall 2004, p1-3, il, por
Record #:
26353
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina Wildlife Federation and wildlife enthusiasts gathered in Huntersville in mid-September to kick off a new volunteer committee structure designed for more effective advocacy and action in wildlife issues.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 52 Issue 3, Fall 2004, p2
Record #:
26349
Author(s):
Abstract:
There are fish consumption advisories for inland game fish and coastal fish. The fish are likely to be contaminated with dioxin, PCBs, or mercury. Mercury is a particular concern because it is easily dispersed and can cause permanent brain damage.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 52 Issue 3, Fall 2004, p2
Record #:
26350
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Wildlife Federation has provided formal opposition to a proposed poultry operation in Hyde County. Waste disposal would put the Pocosin Lakes and Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuges at risk.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 52 Issue 3, Fall 2004, p2
Subject(s):
Record #:
26351
Author(s):
Abstract:
A group of volunteers led by Habitat Stewards will establish Squirrel Lake Park as a certified wildlife habitat in Matthew’s Town. Volunteers will create butterfly and bird gardens, install bird feeders and nesting boxes, and erect an information kiosk.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 52 Issue 3, Fall 2004, p2
Record #:
26352
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Wildlife and Industry Together initiative is one of North Carolina Wildlife Federation’s flagship wildlife habitat enhancement programs. Companies help benefit wildlife by transforming underutilized property into healthy and attractive habitats.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 52 Issue 3, Fall 2004, p2
Record #:
5833
Abstract:
Among the winners of the North Carolina Wildlife Federation's Governor's Achievement Award are Jerry Holloman, Wildlife Conservationist of the Year; Dr. John E. Wear, Jr., Conservationist of the Year; Duane Raver, North Carolina Conservation Hall of Fame; David Wesley Barger, II, Wildlife Enforcement Officer of the Year.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 51 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2003, p5-7, por
Record #:
7539
Author(s):
Abstract:
Gestwicki describes three wildlife fights that the North Carolina Wildlife Federation undertook to save threatened species and areas. These include work that led to passage by the N.C. General Assembly of the Freshwater Turtle Bill, which mandates strict protection of one of the state's most vulnerable species; creation of riparian buffers, starting in 2002, to protect wildlife in the Catawba River corridors; and opposition which led to the abandonment in 2003 of the proposed Oregon Inlet jetties.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 51 Issue 2, Fall 2003, p1, 3, il
Record #:
26365
Abstract:
The North Carolina Wildlife Federation advocates for wildlife issues through partnerships with environmental groups, state agencies, and industry. Their efforts resulted in the Clean Smokestack Bill passed in Raleigh last summer to address air quality problems.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 51 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2003, p3
Record #:
26366
Author(s):
Abstract:
Staff of the North Carolina Wildlife Federation traveled around the state to promote wildlife conservation, introduce habitat enhancement projects, and help people become involved in nature.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 51 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2003, p3, il
Record #:
26363
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Wildlife Federation aims to protect habitat for wildlife and foster ways for people to interact with nature. The Federation has developed several habitat enhancement programs and certified over one-thousand habitat locations across the state.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 51 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2003, p1-3, il
Record #:
26364
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Wildlife Federation passed ten new resolutions to guide its legislative and policy agenda, and provide a work plan for conservation action priorities. Efforts focus on hunting locations, wetland protection, and proximity of development to wildlife refuges.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 51 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2003, p2
Record #:
5257
Abstract:
Two Vulcan Materials quarry sites, Cabarrus County and Clear Creek, have been recognized by the North Carolina Wildlife Federation for their participation in the Wildlife and Industry Together (W.A.I.T.) program. The Vulcan quarries agreed, as part of the program \"to manage a portion of their property for wildlife habitats.\" These are the first quarries to be W.A.I.T. certified in North Carolina.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 50 Issue 2, Summer 2002, p6, il
Subject(s):