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10 results for United States. Congress. Senate
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Record #:
8690
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Abstract:
In the late 18th- and early 19th-centuries, the U.S. Congress allowed senators to orate long speeches every Saturday. These speeches were written down and printed in newspapers. One Saturday in 1820, North Carolina senator Felix Walker announced he wanted to “make a speech for Buncombe.” He then launched into a speech lasting several hours during which he did not say anything useful. Such a speech became known as BUNCOMBE and appears in the unabridged Merriam-Webster English dictionary.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 6, Nov 1981, p11-12, por, bibl
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Record #:
10525
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Abstract:
Retired United States Senator Jesse Helms died July 4, 2008. Over one thousand friends, family, neighbors, and public figures gathered for the funeral at the Hayes Barton Baptist Church in the Five Points neighborhood of Raleigh. A number of local leaders, including Hodding Carter III, Julius Chambers, Tom Lambeth, and Howard Lee, comment on Helm's legacy.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 28, July 2008, p5, 7, 9, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
11175
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Jesse Helms Jr., North Carolina's newly elected United States Senator, discusses the recent senatorial campaign and other issues in this We the People of North Carolina interview.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 31 Issue 1, Jan 1973, p27-30, il, por
Record #:
11333
Abstract:
In January 1973, Jesse Helms became the first Republican United States Senator from North Carolina to take his seat in Congress since the late 19th-century. This article examines what he did during his first year.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 32 Issue 2, Feb 1974, p34-35, 37, il, por
Record #:
11571
Abstract:
North Carolinians elected Robert Morgan of Harnett County to the United States Senate in 1974. In this We the People of North Carolina interview, Morgan discusses his first year in the Senate.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 34 Issue 2, Feb 1976, p32-34, 46-47, por
Record #:
11570
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolinians elected Jesse Helms to the United States Senate in 1972. In this We the People of North Carolina interview, Helms discusses his work in the Senate and his philosophy of government.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 34 Issue 2, Feb 1976, p30-31, 46, por
Record #:
14037
Abstract:
Jesse Helms, North Carolina's senior United States Senator, has been in Congress nearly twelve years. In this BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA interview, Helms discusses a wide range of topics - from the state's business climate to federal spending to politics.
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Record #:
14801
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Abstract:
Thomas Benton, a Hillsboro native, served thirty years as a United States Senator for Missouri and was a staunch advocate for the westward expansion of the United States. He was also a violent opponent of slavery and the annexation Texas on these grounds.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 35, Jan 1945, p10-11, 20
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Record #:
14828
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Lawrence classifies David Stone as the champion office-holder of North Carolina. He probably held more political jobs than any other prominent citizen in the history of the State, serving in the North Carolina House of Commons, as a State Supreme Court Judge, in the U.S House of Representatives, U.S. Senate, and Governor from 1810-1812.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 44, Mar 1945, p8, f
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Record #:
32991
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author revisites the 33 North Carolinians that have so far (1942) been elected to the US Senate.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 12, Aug 1942, p5
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