NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


2 results for Tree planting--Greenville
Currently viewing results 1 - 2
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
24814
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since the 1840’s there has been a conflict between those cutting down and those planting trees in Greenville. Every time trees were planted, they were eventually cut down or damaged. In 1990, this problem was patched with the formation of ReLeaf. ReLeaf is a non-profit organization that plants and protects trees using donations from the community.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , October/November 2014, p38-41, il
Full Text:
Record #:
23406
Author(s):
Abstract:
Kammerer bemoans the loss of the numerous large trees in Greenville and gives a history of trees in town. Local newspapers began in 1883 expressing fear that soon there would be no trees in Greenville because people were cutting them down. Edward B. Ficklin planted pecan trees on Fifth Street in the 1890s. When the city began to widen west Fifth Street in 1910, R. O. Jeffries sued the city to keep his shade trees, but the city won. Jacques Busbee began the beautification of the East Carolina Teachers College, planting camellia bushes in front of the old Austin building, and W. L. Wright had a Japanese sunken lake created in 1929. This lake and the land around it became the Davis Arboretum in 1935, but the lake was drained in the 1950s. The Greenville Woman’s Club planted crepe myrtles all over Greenville beginning in 1922. Henry W. Martin planted oak trees along Fifth Street from 1920 to 1929. In 1970 the canopy of trees was cut down to widen the street. In 1990, a the future of trees in Greenville got a boost when ReLeaf, a community-based volunteer nonprofit organization, was created to plant, promote, and protect canopy trees.
Source: