NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


6 results for Snakes--Research
Currently viewing results 1 - 6
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
26069
Author(s):
Abstract:
Batesian mimicry occurs when a harmless species closely resembles a harmful species. David Pfenning, professor of biology, studies the scarlet kingsnake and the venomous eastern coral snake. According to Pfenning, mimicry is a survival strategy that evolves based on a species’ predators and prey.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 18 Issue 1, Fall 2001, p30-32, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
10002
Author(s):
Abstract:
Brown discusses food habits of snakes from North and South Carolina, providing information on 690 food items from 479 snakes of 32 species.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 1, Mar 1979, p113-124, bibl Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
30061
Abstract:
The timber rattlesnake and the canebrake rattlesnake are two subspecies of the rattlesnake, Crotalus horridus, thought to occur in the eastern United States. This study examined variation in pattern, adult size, and morphology among rattlesnake species in North Carolina and other eastern states.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 12, Sept 1986, p57-74, il, map, bibl Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
30145
Abstract:
The Florida red-bellied snake (Storeria occipitomaculata obscura) is a nominate subspecies of the redbelly snake (Storeria occipitomaculata). Redbelly snake populations occurring in the Gulf Coastal Plain from eastern Texas to the Carolinas were found to differ from the nominate Florida subspecies in nuchal pattern, ventral coloration, relative tail length, and subcaudal number.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 4, Dec 1980, p95-102, il, map, bibl Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
30147
Author(s):
Abstract:
The stomach contents and food habits of eight species of snakes from the Coastal Plain and Piedmont Plateau regions of North Carolina were identified. The information presented is based on an analysis of previous records and studies. Several snake species can be characterized as opportunists in terms of food items consumed.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 4, Dec 1980, p157-159, bibl Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
35338
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author suggested that rattlesnakes developed this feature as a warning mechanic for its prey. As for why rattlesnakes in particular developed this feature, the author posited that the rapidity of the tail’s movement could have facilitated the growth of extra skin, which formed the rattle.
Source:
Subject(s):