NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


6 results for Sherman, William T., 1820-1891
Currently viewing results 1 - 6
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
20914
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article looks at the circumstances surrounding William Tecumseh Sherman's march on the South through the Carolinas on his way to support General Ulysses S. Grant in his assault on General Robert E. Lee at Richmond. Details of Sherman's course through North Carolina and occupancy of various cities including Monroe's Cross-Roads, Fayetteville, Bentonville, Goldsboro are included.
Full Text:
Record #:
24569
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Battle of Bentonville was the largest land battle fought in North Carolina during the American Civil War and the only full-scale Confederate attempt to stop General Sherman after Atlanta. This article discusses the battle and the Harper House, which served as a field hospital during the battle and is now open to the public as a museum.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 39 Issue 21, April 1972, p14-15, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
35691
Author(s):
Abstract:
Its original name was the “Meeting House”: its latter name, Cape Fear Baptist Church, inspired by the nearby stream. A Colonial construction, this church in Gray’s Creek was touted as one of the first erected in Cumberland County. Its value was also asserted by an illustrious history: a temporary hospital and bivouac site for General Sherman’s troops.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978, p49
Record #:
35919
Author(s):
Abstract:
April was known for two Durham County anniversaries, one being the 116th anniversary of General Joseph Johnston’s surrender to General William Sherman. The latter event appears to have generated only loss, but the author proved otherwise. Noted was Union soldiers camping near Bennett Place planted a seed of demand for its bright leaf tobacco. Wealth generated from the demand yielded the relocation of Trinity College to Durham. From an endowment by James B. Duke came the transformation of Trinity College into Duke University.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 4, Apr 1981, p64
Record #:
37606
Author(s):
Abstract:
Chronicled is Wilmington’s Fort Fisher on December 24th, 1864, and January 13th, 1865. Key players in the battles hinting the Confederacy’s end: Union Generals Sherman and Grant; Confederate Generals Lamb, Whiting, and Bragg. Factors contributing to the outcome were General Whiting’s garrison outnumbered 6 to 1 during the second assault and General Bragg’s belief in Fort Fisher’s invulnerability.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 7, December 2014, p193-194, 196, 198, 200, 202, 204, por Periodical Website
Record #:
37637
Author(s):
Abstract:
An approach General Sherman became famous for—high risks actions yielding great victories—worked on the battlefield and off. On the battlefield illustrations took him and his combined forces, the Army of the Tennessee and Georgia, through Goldsboro, Fayetteville, and Wilmington before reaching South Carolina’s capital by February 1865. It was in Columbia the battle Sherman believed hastened the end of the war took place, one that, like his march through Atlanta, culminated in a great fire.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 9, February 2015, p151-152, 154, 156, 158, 160 Periodical Website