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Record #:
8464
Abstract:
During the Civil War salt was a commodity that was hard to come by in North Carolina. Early in the war the state government built a salt works at Morehead City and started work on a second one on Currituck Sound, but Union troops captured both sites in 1862. Westbrook recounts how the state government and private entrepreneurs worked to provide citizens and soldiers with salt for the remainder of the Civil War. By 1864, most salt production in the state had ceased.
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Record #:
8707
Abstract:
During the blockades of the Revolution, the War of 1812, and the Civil War, it became necessary for North Carolina to convert its gristmills to saltworks. Windmills were used to pump sea water into the plant, where it was then either boiled or evaporated, leaving only salt residue. Toward the end of the Civil War, several saltworks were destroyed by Yankee forces. So far, only thirteen saltworks that used windmills in production have been identified. They are in New Hanover, Carteret, and Brunswick counties.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 9, Feb 1982, p16-18, 28, il
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Record #:
24526
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author recounts the importance of salt in North Carolina’s economy since the 1700s. During the American Revolution, salt was scarce, prompting towns on the coast of North Carolina to build their own salt works for local production.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 4, September 1977, p16-18, 39, il
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