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31 results for Railroads--History
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Record #:
9586
Abstract:
The Wilmington Railroad Museum, which focuses on the history of the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad, recently opened. When the line began operation in 1835, it was the world's longest railroad. The line has changed names several times, finally becoming the Atlantic Coast Line in 1900. The museum is located in a warehouse built by the railroad in 1876. Exhibits include a train caboose, a model train set, and the Wilmington and Weldon arrival bell.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 12, May 1984, p19-20, il
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Record #:
10608
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North Carolina's earliest railroads were plagued by mechanical failures that often resulted in wrecks, derailments, and deaths. Even after the introduction of steam engines, many tracks and rails were constructed completely of wood or, later, wooden rails capped with thin strips of metal. The wooden rails would often fail outright, and the metal-capped rails often lost their tops, which would then bend upwards, piercing the floor of the rail car. The grandson of Governor Edward Dudley was seriously injured and his nurse killed by an unfastened rail in 1845.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 4, July 1970, p15-16, il
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Record #:
13899
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Albert Johnson handled the throttle on the first train that operated on the Raleigh & Gaston Railroad more than one hundred years ago.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 18 Issue 5, July 1950, p11, 21, il, f
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Record #:
14332
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Robert R. Bridgers faced a stupendous task, following the conclusion of the American Civil War, in rebuilding what is now the great Atlantic Coast Line System.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 7, July 1947, p21,22
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Record #:
14459
Abstract:
The first train to Asheboro came over fifty years ago, and it was a big day in the history of the town, despite the fact that rails had to be laid as the train approached.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 36, Feb 1948, p7
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Record #:
14565
Abstract:
Taylorsville citizens invested in the local Alexander Railroad line when the company, The Southern, threatened to end service. The town, located in Alexander County, depended on the railroad spur, which hauled freight and mail, for economic stability. Freight statistics for the line both before and after the sale are listed.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 7, July 1946, p8, il
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Record #:
14628
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Mr. Goerch describes a round-trip ride in 1946 in the cab of the Seaboard Air Line Railroad's diesel engines. The ride on \"The Sun Queen\" left Raleigh bound for Richmond and for the author's return trip \"The Silver Meteor.\" Goerch discusses improvement in rail service because of diesel engines which increase speed with less noise. The author also supplements details of his ride with railroad vernacular, operational procedures, and railroad culture.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 28, Dec 1946, p7-9, 18, il
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Record #:
15031
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When construction gangs were attempting to complete the pass for the first train tracks on both sides of the Blue Ridge Mountains, the western side had more difficulty due to lack of locomotives to help the work progress. It took eight yoke of oxen to get a locomotive to the western side of the divide. The job was done in two weeks and the railroad complete shortly after.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 2, June 1940, p9
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Record #:
15148
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Colonel Alexander B. Andrews has served North Carolina not only as a solider during the American Civil War, but helped to build and maintain the railroads that were necessary for the State during the era of Reconstruction. He started his great building career as superintendent of the Raleigh and Gaston Railroad and helped to rehabilitate this line as well as the Richmond and Danville and the Asheville-Spartanburg line.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 1, June 1939, p6-7, 28, por
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Record #:
15860
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Seay recounts some of the forgotten events that are revealed by the old files of some of the state's early railroad companies of one hundred years or more ago. The information shows quite a bit of contrast between railroading then and now.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 36, Feb 1936, p5, 21, il
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Record #:
20789
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Seay describes what railroading was like in North Carolina almost a century ago.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 48, Apr 1947, p10
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Record #:
21456
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Before the 1870s there was a preference in the United States that the federal and state governments would subsidize private corporations but did not attempt to control them. This was the case when North Carolina held a three-quarters interest in the North Carolina Railroad (NCRR). The NCRR was built to help enable trade and travel to and within the Piedmont region of North Carolina. Chartered in 1849, the NCRR was the center of some controversy as to the style and amount of state control until it was leased out by the state in 1871.
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North Carolina Historical Review (NoCar F251 .N892), Vol. 61 Issue 2, Apr 1984, p174-204 , il, por, map, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
24453
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This article presents the history of the North Carolina Railroad Company, which owns the tracks upon which the Carolinian travels. The tracks were built in the decade before the Civil War in order to promote and facilitate economic development in the Piedmont.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 58 Issue 12, May 1991, p18-20, por
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Record #:
24532
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One section of the historic East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad is being saved and put to recreational use by taking tourists on rides through some of the most dramatic and beautiful sections of the track.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 6, November 1977, p18-20, il
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Record #:
6196
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Abstract:
Five North Carolina railroads were authorized by legislation between 1829 and 1833. The last one chartered was the first to build. It was called The Experimental Railroad and carried heavy granite stones one-and-a-half miles from a Raleigh quarry to the site where the State Capitol building was being rebuilt after a fire.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 20 Issue 3, Spring 1981, p3, 29, bibl
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