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6 results for Prison sentences
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Record #:
1061
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North Carolina citizens, lawmakers, judges and administrators are struggling with prison-reform proposals. The state is in dire need of some type of remedy for prison overcrowding.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 11 Issue 17, Apr/May 1993, p10-13, por Periodical Website
Record #:
1394
Author(s):
Abstract:
Steve Lan'ge has been an inmate at the Johnston County Correctional Facility for the past nineteen years. Sentenced before the Fair Sentencing Act was instituted, Lan'ge has seen other inmates convicted of similar crimes come and go.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 12 Issue 4, Jan 1994, p7-11, por Periodical Website
Record #:
23268
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tucker examines how before 1994, burglary could land a person a life term in prison. Today, the same charge carries a maximum sentence of four years.
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Record #:
23266
Author(s):
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Derrick McRae serves a life prison sentence for a crime he says he did not commit. His case has been appealed and two attorneys work to have him vindicated.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 1, January 2015, p7-17, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25638
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Abstract:
In 1984, more than three-quarters of new admissions to North Carolina prisons were for non-violent offenses. The state must decide whether it can afford to continue imprisoning people who commit property and “public order” crimes. State leaders can divert some offenders to highly supervised work programs or spend up to $300 million to building more prisons.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Jan 31-Feb 13 1986, p1, 10-14, por Periodical Website
Record #:
28431
Author(s):
Abstract:
As overpopulated prisons have sapped government budgets, there has been a push to make sentencing reforms retroactive. Cumberland County native Larry Stubbs is hopeful that this push will mean he will be released from prison after serving life in prison for second-degree burglary. The same crime today carries a maximum sentence of four years. Prison reform and Stubbs’ fight for justice are detailed.
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