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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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5 results for Painting, Italian
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Record #:
1572
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Museum of Art's high-quality Bolognese paintings constitute the most solid and diverse collection in any United States museum.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Winter 1992, p3-8, il
Record #:
37163
Author(s):
Abstract:
Old and New Worlds, along with the Renaissance and modern day, meld in the fresco painted by Ben Long, who studied the art form in Italy before bringing it to this Episcopal church’s walls. Long, also the painter of the frescoes in St. Mary’s in West Jefferson, has helped make these churches popular visitation spots, who the author numbered at 50,000 people annually.
Record #:
37030
Author(s):
Abstract:
Old and New Worlds, along with the Renaissance and modern day, meld in the fresco painted by Ben Long, who studied the art form in Italy before bringing it to this Episcopal church’s walls. Long, also the painter of the frescoes in St. Mary’s in West Jefferson, has helped make these churches popular visitation spots, who the author numbered at 50,000 people annually.
Record #:
36178
Author(s):
Abstract:
Faux was defined as making surfaces look like something else. Faux finishes noted were fresco, Venetian plaster, marbleizing, stenciling, rag painting, sponging, strie (French for stripe or streak), and faux bois (French for fake wood). Referenced were the Italian and French schools that emerged during the Renaissance, the latter profiled artist Pandy Autry reflected in her work.
Source:
Record #:
36473
Author(s):
Abstract:
A perhaps lesser known architectural endeavor of Asheville’s Douglas Ellison is a home he blueprinted based on his vision of an Irish monastery. A source of inspiration for the home’s architectural design was The Book of Kells, which its original owner, Rose Brown, also drew from for the house’s interior. She decorated the walls with frescoes containing religious themes such as the four apostles. Proof of Brown’s frescoes and The Book of Kells’ enduring inspiration is the present owner, Rebecca Crosson. In addition to renovating the frescoes, Crosson is producing paintings inspired by the book believed written in the eighth century.