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5 results for North Carolina--History, Colonial period, ca. 1600-1775--Religion
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Record #:
9230
Abstract:
For forty years after King Charles II granted a charter to the eight Lords Proprietor for Carolina, little serious effort was made to establish churches and clergymen there. This was because the population was sparse and scattered along the northern Carolina coast. Also many of the colonists were religious dissenters who did not wish to see the Anglican Church established with all its pomp and ceremony. Skaggs discusses the problems the colony dealt with in attracting clergy.
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Record #:
15045
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lawrence details the interesting story of how the Baptists, Methodists, and Presbyterians established themselves within the boundaries of North Carolina during its early history.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 8, July 1940, p9, 22
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Record #:
15364
Author(s):
Abstract:
Pilmoor Memorial Methodist Church, founded in 1928, at Currituck Courthouse was erected as a memorial to Reverend Joseph Pilmore. He was the first minister of the Methodist Church to preach in North Carolina. Sent to America in 1769 by the Conference of England, Pilmore preached his first sermon three hundred yards from the church site on September 28, 1772.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 26, Nov 1934, p8, il
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Record #:
20477
Author(s):
Abstract:
Freedom of religion marked the life of early North Carolina colonists through most of the 17th century as a result of indifference, economic ambitions of the Lords Proprietors, and the sentiment of the times that brought people to the New World. However, when religion became involved in provincial politics, toleration ceased.
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Record #:
17278
Author(s):
Abstract:
Religion played an important role from the beginning of European exploration and settlement in the New World. Early North Carolina experienced constant tension, though, over religion. In the 1700s the colony developed as an independent place, mostly tolerant of different faiths but ministers and missionaries to the North Carolina colony found spreading religion difficult.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 51 Issue 2, Spring 2012, p15-17, map, f