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9 results for Music festivals--Raleigh
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Record #:
24257
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The International Bluegrass Music Association holds an annual convention and music festival in Raleigh to celebrate bluegrass music. This article addresses the history and heritage of bluegrass, and considers how this legacy limits the genre's ability to evolve.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 39, September 2015, p18-19, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
24744
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In 2010, Greg Lowenhagen started the Hopscotch Music Festival, which takes place in downtown Raleigh annually. Cicely Mitchell wanted to implement a similar concept in Durham, and in 2014 held the first Art of Cool Fest. Both of these music festivals highlight North Carolina musicians, bring people together, and boost the economy in two of the Triangle’s urban spaces.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 46, November 2015, p16-17, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27328
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Over the past 15 years there has been a renewed interest in traditional music. The Coen brothers’ film, O Brother Where Art Thou? (2001), and the film’s soundtrack are credited with this rise in popularity. The band from the film, The Soggy Bottom Boys, headlined the fourth meeting of the International Bluegrass Music Association’s festival in Raleigh, NC. The festival has seen an increase in turnout and a more diverse audience as a result of the film’s lasting impact and modern folk-inspired acts like the Avett Brothers.
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Record #:
27232
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Citizens are working to make Dix Park a vital part of downtown Raleigh. To support their efforts, the city and Dix Park Conservancy are hosting Destination Dix, a free, one-day community festival in the park this Saturday. The festival will feature food trucks, artists, and a variety of musicians, with Chatham County Line and Bombadil as headliners.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 29, July 2016, p19, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27276
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The first headliner announced for this year's Hopscotch music festival was Lavender Country, a radical project dating back to the early seventies that's widely recognized as the first-ever openly gay country band. Other musicians include folk artist Joan Shelley and blues rock artist Adia Victoria.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 36, Sept 2016, p19, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27275
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The seventh year of the Hopscotch Music Festival begins in early September in downtown Raleigh. The festival’s biggest strength is its diversity of music, yet, the lineup still lacks representation of hip hop and rap artists.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 36, Sept 2016, p17, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27659
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The bluegrass festival is fast becoming Raleigh’s signature annual event. The World of Bluegrass conference and the Wide Open Bluegrass festival are being supported by the city like no event in the past. Some question whether the festival will be as successful in its second year, but increased growth and excitement surrounding this year’s festival, suggest it may stay in Raleigh for years to come.
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Record #:
27660
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Raleigh resident Joe Newberry is an award winning songwriter and will perform at this year’s Wide Open Bluegrass festival. Newberry serves as the director of communications for the North Carolina Symphony. Newberry’s songs have won several awards as performed by artists such as the Gibson Brothers and he has performed together with Garrison Keillor on A Prairie Home Companion several times.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 31 Issue 40, October 2014, p14-15 Periodical Website
Record #:
28794
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The local Triangle music scene was active in 2016 amidst North Carolina politics and civil rights issues. In response to House Bill Two, music festivals and musicians used their shows as platforms for protest and fundraisers for organizations like Equality NC and the Human Rights Campaign.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 50, Dec 2016, p22-23, por Periodical Website
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