NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


7 results for Migration--Internal
Currently viewing results 1 - 7
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
1075
Author(s):
Abstract:
Information extracted from the 1990 Census reveals how North Carolina residents have moved within and outside the state.
Record #:
9276
Abstract:
Many of North Carolina's 19th-century settlers were from Northern Ireland. Most came to port in Maryland and Pennsylvania and drove covered wagons to North Carolina. Many lived in homesteads and not manor-houses. The Ulster Folk Museum at Holywood, County Down, in Ireland is a recreated North Ireland county town open to the public.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 8, Jan 1979, p12-13, 58, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
20514
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article looks at the heavy migration from Iredell County between 1800 and 1850. An examination of land records and wills indicates that military bounty lands in Tennessee and land sales in Kentucky were early motivators for the exodus, however the popularity of westward migrations skyrocketed as people moved towards the waters of Ohio, Tennessee and Mobile, as well Missouri, Illinois and the western states seeking land employment opportunities as population pressures in counties in NC were increasing. Some reprints of letters written by migrants to family or friends back in Iredell country are included.
Full Text:
Record #:
2346
Abstract:
Following the Great Wagon Road and the Great Indian Trading Path, settlers began moving into the Piedmont shortly before the Revolution. Despite Indian warfare and the Regulator conflict, the best land was occupied by farms and towns by the 1770s.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 34 Issue 2, Spring 1995, p16-21, il, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
2351
Abstract:
From 1980 to 1990 about 400,000 people moved to the state. New jobs and industries in the three largest metropolitan areas attracted Blacks to return, as well as large numbers of Asians and Hispanics. In-state residents moved to urban from rural areas.
Source:
Record #:
2345
Abstract:
Whites left the state in the 19th Century because of farm problems and poor state government, while lack of opportunities and a repressive environment caused Blacks to leave. As conditions improved for both, the need to leave lessened.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 34 Issue 2, Spring 1995, p27-32, il, por
Record #:
2344
Author(s):
Abstract:
Though land was cheap, rugged mountains, the lack of good roads, political conflict with the east, and isolation were challenges to those who came to the mountains to farm, start businesses, or search for gold.
Source: