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4 results for Leeches
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Record #:
10003
Abstract:
One terrestrial leech, Haemopis septagon, inhabits North Carolina in the swamps and moist floodplains of the eastern Piedmont and Coastal Plain. It was discovered in 1972 and is one of the newest additions to the state's known fauna. Large earthworms appear to be the primary food source.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 1, Mar 1979, p129-134, il, map, bibl Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
9470
Author(s):
Abstract:
Leeches are highly specialized worms and are related to earthworms and a group of marine worms called polychaets. Most live in shallow water, but some have adapted to a terrestrial environment. One terrestrial leech, Haemopis septagon, inhabits North Carolina in the swamps and moist floodplains of the eastern Piedmont and Coastal Plain. It was discovered in 1972 and is one of the newest additions to the state's known fauna.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
28207
Abstract:
Three taxa within the leech family Glossiphoniidae are poorly known with respect to their biology and systematics. New information has been collected on their biology, anatomy, and hunter-prey behaviors.
Subject(s):
Record #:
28255
Abstract:
The leech Oligobdella biannulata is a species endemic to mountain streams of the Southern Blue Ridge Physiographic Zone, and is thought to be host specific to salamanders. Host salamanders were collected in North Carolina and South Carolina, and examined for leeches. Observations revealed a much wider range of salamander hosts than had previously been reported.