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13 results for Juvenile delinquency
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Record #:
410
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The state's juvenile delinquency policy needs reviewing in order that it might offer solutions to the problems associated with delinquency.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Winter 1979, p3-7
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Record #:
409
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House Bill 456 offers a new and unique approach to dealing with juvenile delinquents.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 2 Issue 3, Summer 1979, p12-13, il
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Record #:
2073
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The confidentiality of juvenile court proceedings is determined by such factors as whether a hearing is open to the public, how much publicity there is, and whether records of the proceeding are restricted.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 60 Issue 2, Fall 1994, p2-10, il, f
Record #:
2389
Abstract:
Many state cities, like Jacksonville, are resorting to curfews to set limits for youth whose parents will not. The curfew helps curb vandalism, control juvenile crime, and reduce chances for young people to become victims or be lured into crime.
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 45 Issue 6, June 1995, p1,8-9, il
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Record #:
15494
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Judge William Pless discusses what North Carolina courts should do with juvenile first offenders. Often, due to the lack of reformatory facilities, these juveniles are paroled into the care of parents or guardians who fail to properly direct the children, and often they are seen in the courts again. Pless argues that \"prison camps\" that can demonstrate life in prison for young boys may help prevent them from continuing on a path of crime.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 37, Feb 1936, p1, f
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Record #:
17440
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This article concludes a series of reports on the advisory committee meeting on jail standards. This installment discusses mental cases and juvenile delinquency.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 14 Issue 10, Oct 1948, p12-13
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Record #:
17601
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Confinement of children in jail, often contrary to state law, though decreasing, still continues. Children over fourteen charged with committing felonies may be held in jail for only two legitimate reasons: punishment after conviction and case held in the Supreme Court.
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Record #:
18019
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Recent research discusses the role of cultural factors in determining delinquent behavior in juveniles.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 36 Issue 7, Apr 1970, p14-17
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Record #:
18056
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Issues of juvenile delinquency is on the rise, and currently North Carolina has no law requiring that any state agency collect and analyze data on the extent of juvenile delinquency in the state.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 37 Issue 6, Mar 1971, p22-24
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Record #:
18255
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A new study conducted in Mecklenburg County (including Charlotte and its suburbs), surveyed 9,716 junior and senior high school students regarding their delinquent behaviors.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 41 Issue 1, Summer 1975, p37-42
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Record #:
24662
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Asheville boasts two police officers who were specially trained to handle juveniles who find themselves in trouble. Their work may help to lower juvenile delinquency statistics in the region.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 15, December 1957, p13-14, il
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Record #:
24714
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In Mount Airy, juvenile delinquency was a budding problem. A group of law enforcement officers took it upon themselves to round up juveniles who had been in trouble and take them fishing. The rate of juvenile delinquency has decreased as a result.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 50, May 1952, p3-4, il
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Record #:
29071
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A proposal to increase the age of juvenile jurisdiction in North Carolina could keep about eleven thousand teenagers out of the state's adult court system each year, beginning in December 2019. This would direct sixteen- and seventeen-year-olds charged with misdemeanors and two classes of nonviolent felonies to juvenile court.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 23, June 28 2017, p8, por Periodical Website
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