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14 results for Jazz musicians
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Record #:
756
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Wilmington's 68 year-old Harry van Velsor practices medicine by day and blows the saxophone by night.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 60 Issue 3, Aug 1992, p16-17, por
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Record #:
1812
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Winston-Salem native Matt Kendrick, perhaps the state's most promising jazz composer, was awarded his second Jazz Composer Fellowship by the North Carolina Arts Council.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 12 Issue 29, July 1994, p13, por Periodical Website
Record #:
4922
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Thousands of North Carolinians who listen to and enjoy jazz are unaware that many world-famous performers are from the state. They include Percy Heath, Billy Taylor, Maceo Parker, John Coltrane, and Thelonius Monk.
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16746
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Jazz pianist and educator Chip Crawford, a Raleigh native, and his wife vocalist Eve Cornelius have earned a great deal of praise for their new album which features a host of Triangle jazz players.
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17034
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Jazz has had its ups and downs, in terms of fan support, in the last 80 years, though it remains one of America's great contributions to the world of music. In North Carolina, Duke University has taken steps to ensure the future of the Duke Jazz Ensemble by hiring jazz artist John Brown.
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Record #:
23426
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Louis Armstrong was born in New Orleans in 1901. Armstrong sang on the streets as a child and was influenced by the jazz he heard there. He taught himself to play the cornet and began playing in the local clubs. In 1922, he joined Joe \"King\" Oliver's band in Chicago, which started his recording career. Armstrong then started his own band, the Hot Seven (originally the Hot Five). He married in 1942 and bought a house in Queens, New York. He averaged three hundred concerts a year, appeared in thirty films, and wrote two autobiographies. Armstrong was nicknamed \"Satchmo,\" short for Satchelmouth, which was a joke about the size of his mouth. On November 3, 1959, \"Satchmo\" came to Greenville, and performed in the Raynor - Forbes Tobacco Warehouse with more than 1,000 persons attending.
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Record #:
24763
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Al Strong is a trumpet player who is at the center of the jazz renaissance in the Triangle Area. A music professor and performer, Strong co-founded Durham’s Art of Cool Festival, a spring music festival that features jazz, soul, and R&B music.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 2, January 2016, p16-18, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26963
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Paul Jeffrey, a saxophonist and Duke music professor, has been a major force in pioneering jazz education. He has also played an important role in documenting the achievements of local jazz musicians, such as Thelonius Monk and John Coltrane, through transcriptions of their music.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 6 Issue 3, Feb 11-24 1988, p21, por Periodical Website
Record #:
27126
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Terence Blanchard, trumpeter and leader of the quintet E-Collective, isn’t afraid of injecting politics into his music. His latest album, Breathless, explores the meaning of groove, police violence, and community building through music. Blanchard is one of this year’s featured musicians at Art of Cool Festival in Durham.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 18, May 2016, p17, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27125
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The critic Stanley Crouch described jazz as democracy in sound. This is demonstrated by Kamasi Washington and Anderson Paak at this year’s Art of Cool in Durham. The duo reinvigorates jazz by integrating hip-hop, rap, and soulful sounds.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 18, May 2016, p16, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
23692
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Billy Taylor, a Pitt County native, was a jazz pianist and composer who became one of the music form’s most ardent advocates through radio, television and the landmark Jazzmobile arts venture. William E. (Billy) Taylor, Jr. died Dec. 28, 2010 in New York City. He was born July 24, 1921 in Greenville, NC, the son of William E. Taylor, a dentist, and Antoinette Bacon, a school teacher. Billy Taylor, Jr. spent his early childhood in the Ayden-Grifton area before his parents moved to Washington, DC. He performed with all the jazz greats in the 1940’s and 50’s and had the “Billy Taylor Trio.” In 1958, Taylor was named artistic director for NBC’s “The Subject Is Jazz,“ the first network TV series devoted to the genre. He worked as a disc jockey in New York and created the “Jazzmobile,” a traveling stage for free summer concerts in New York City. Taylor went on to host television and NPR radio shows. From 1994 until his death, Dr. Taylor held the position of artistic advisor on jazz for the John F. Kennedy Center for Performing Arts. In later years Dr. Taylor worked as a music professor at ECU and in 2002 gave his name to ECU’s long-running jazz festival.
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Record #:
28931
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In an interview with Jim Ketch of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Music Department, Ketch discussed North Carolina’s place in the jazz world. He talked about the influence of Thelonious Monk and John Coltrane on jazz, and how jazz music is evolving throughout the state.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 15 Issue 2, Winter 2001, p4-5, por
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Record #:
29018
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George Clinton, North Carolina native and legend of P-Funk music, is a headliner at the Art of Cool Festival in Durham this weekend. Clinton has been a uniting figure for generations, with his music empowering African Americans to fight for social and racial equality. Most of the performers at this year’s festival were strongly influenced by Clinton’s music.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 15, April 2017, p28-29, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
29017
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The Museum of Durham History has a new exhibit, Durham A-Z: J is for Jazz. The exhibit covers Durham’s half-century history of jazz music and musicians, as well as the development of North Carolina Central University’s jazz program.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 15, April 2017, p26, por Periodical Website
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