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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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25 results for Insurance, Health
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Record #:
43
Abstract:
Large segments of the state's population have little or no health coverage, which has definite consequences for the health care system and for the economy.
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Record #:
44
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ross profiles three North Carolina families without private health insurance.
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North Carolina Insight (NoCar JK 4101 N3x), Vol. 13 Issue 3-4, Nov 1991, p42-47, il, por, bibl, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
116
Author(s):
Abstract:
For Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina, the desirable, profitable course of action often conflicts with its original mission of being a non-profit insurance provider for the masses.
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Record #:
203
Author(s):
Abstract:
O'Connor discusses the high cost of health care with an emphasis on the cost of insuring employees of municipalities.
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 42 Issue 3, Mar 1992, p1-8, il
Record #:
572
Author(s):
Abstract:
Employers are pressing insurers for innovations, and the responses are leading companies to conclude that Health Maintenance Organizations are the best option.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 6, June 1991, p46-53, il
Record #:
965
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1993-1994 General Assembly is attempting to define its role in confronting several tough issues, including health insurance reform, the environment, and constitutional reform.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 51 Issue 2, Feb 1993, p18-19, por
Record #:
967
Author(s):
Abstract:
In North Carolina, questions remain about the concept of managed competition as a solution to the health care problem.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 51 Issue 2, Feb 1993, p24-32, il, por
Record #:
1428
Author(s):
Abstract:
By 1995, health maintenance organizations (HMOs) are projected to account for 75% of the health care market. In response to this trend, pharmaceutical firms are adjusting their business and marketing practices.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 52 Issue 2, Feb 1994, p52-57,59, il
Record #:
1480
Author(s):
Abstract:
Local governments would face an increase in the number of employees and dependents for which they would be required to pay premiums under the Clinton Health Security Plan.
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 44 Issue 3, Mar 1994, p1,8-10, il
Record #:
1478
Author(s):
Abstract:
The State Health Plan Purchasing Alliance (SHPPA) applies the old idea of the food co-op to health insurance. By banding together, small businesses (in this case, two to forty-nine employees) hope to save money on health insurance.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 52 Issue 3, Mar 1994, p32-34, il
Record #:
1586
Abstract:
The North Carolina League of Municipalities created the Risk Management Services (RMS) program as a health care option for cities and towns. The program's success allowed it to roll back and/or maintain rates and to return $2 million to cities and towns
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 44 Issue 5, May 1994, p1,6, il
Record #:
2392
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the cost of health care on the rise, many large and small companies in the state are focusing on wellness and prevention programs. This approach not only helps keep health costs down, but also increases worker productivity.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 53 Issue 7, July 1995, p22-24,26,28,30-31, il
Record #:
2622
Author(s):
Abstract:
The takeover by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina of Durham-based Caring Program for Children concerns health-care advocates who fear loss of financial support for its program to insure children of middle-class families.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 13 Issue 48, Nov 1995, p8-11, il Periodical Website
Record #:
2729
Author(s):
Abstract:
Employers having difficulty deciding on a health care plan will have even more choices in the years ahead, as the state is glutted with managed care companies. In 1996, 22 are in operation, with 14 others planning entry applications.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 54 Issue 2, Feb 1996, p32-35, il