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4 results for Influenza--History
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Record #:
3355
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1918-1919 influenza epidemic killed millions worldwide, including 13,644 in the state. A large number of Army trainees on the University of North Carolina campus died, as did UNC president Edward Kidder Graham.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 57 Issue 11, Apr 1990, p20-21, por
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Record #:
21619
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Group A influenza pandemic that affected the entire world in 1918-1919, killed roughly 13,000 people in the state of North Carolina alone. This event exposed the deficiencies of North Carolina's public health system and motivated the creation of a more effective network of public health agencies by the mid-1920s under the direction of Dr. Watson Smith Rankin. This movement was supported by increased public funding and established support for a permanent public health system.
Source:
Record #:
28681
Abstract:
In 1918 the world-wide epidemic of Spanish influenza reached Wilmington, North Carolina. As the influenza quickly spread, Wilmington went into a state of panic and worked at maximum capacity to combat the epidemic. Described as the greatest disease holocaust of history, the epidemic caused immense loss and suffering.
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Record #:
31631
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since its identification early this year in New Jersey, swine flu has been investigated and tested by scientists across the country. North Carolina health department personnel are preparing to begin mass immunization of the public this month. Frank Lewis, coordinator of the state’s immunization program, discusses the vaccine’s availability and effectiveness in protecting against swine flu, and provides answers to the most commonly asked questions about swine flu.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 8 Issue 9, Sept 1976, p25