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5 results for Gates County--Description and travel
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Record #:
5264
Abstract:
Gates County is OUR STATE magazine's featured county of the month. Total population of the county is 10,500. Gatesville, the county seat, is the only incorporated town. Westbrook describes the county that lies far from the hubbub of big city life but more than makes up for it with an abundance of quiet life and the great outdoors, including Merchants Millpond State Park.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 5, Oct 2002, p137-138, 140, 142, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
18466
Author(s):
Abstract:
Continuing his exploration of North Carolina's counties, Goerch relates points of interest he found in Gates County.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 34, Jan 1942, p1-2, 20-21, il
Full Text:
Record #:
35754
Author(s):
Abstract:
A fragile wilderness could be found in Merchants Millpond State Park, on the southern edge of the Great Dismal Swamp. Despite its fragility, it had an important place and long history in the area. During the nineteenth century, the Millpond contained a gristmill, wheat mill, and sawmill. By the twentieth century, it had become the largest trading center in Gates County. Its present purpose: a viable habitat for animals such as river otters and plant species such as the water violet. As for the State Park’s benefits to humans, that included activities such as camping and backpacking, drawing and guided tours.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, July/Aug 1979, p34-35
Record #:
37198
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hobbsville, Gates Co., NC, was named for David W. Hobbs, first station master for the Suffolk and Carolina Railroad in that area.
Record #:
38269
Author(s):
Abstract:
The area around Merchants Millpond State Park has built a mighty reputation partly on artifacts aged objects, including a Clovis point 10,000 years old discovered in a field near the pond. The area’s fauna and flora, such as six alligators and two hundred year old Cypress trees, also help to make the lake created in 1811 a must see for 240,000 visitors annually.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 4, Sept 2012, p178-180, 182 Periodical Website